Activities for adults with acquired brain injuries

Building confidence and self-esteem
As well as specific therapeutic inputs, such as occupational therapy, physiotherapy and psychology sessions, service users in our care can also choose to take part in a range of activities each week, depending on their needs and abilities. These activities include music sessions, arts and crafts, ASDAN learning sessions, swimming, visiting local cafes, shops, etc. Not only are they fun and enjoyable activities in their own right, but they are also important in providing a ‘normal’ lifestyle and they support the therapeutic regime provided by the Multi-Disciplinary Team.

One popular activity for several of our service users with acquired brain injuries is Rock Club. It brings together people using different brain injury services in Northamptonshire to take part in a wide range of different activities: Anything from a disco and karaoke night to a bake-off competition, film night or quiz.

Halloween is a big event and the fancy dress disco is eagerly anticipated. Sallie Maris, the Arts and Crafts Co-ordinator at The Richardson Partnership for Care helped some of the service users prepare their Halloween costumes, which was all part of the fun.

Dressing up for HalloweenPreparing for the Halloween party

The Rock Club summer fun day was also a big occasion, with a barbecue, side shows and a visit from ‘Party Animals’ – an organisation that enables people to have close encounters with reptiles, rodents and mammals so they can learn more about them, overcome their fears and build confidence. Terry, one of our service users with an acquired brain injury was inspired to create this poster after the Rock Club summer fun day because he enjoyed it so much.

Terry's Rock Club poster

Rock Club events are held in Northamptonshire every other month, but the benefits extend to both before and after each occasion, and they are just part of the programme of activities included in the care plans for our service users.

As well as being very enjoyable, a varied activity schedule is important to service users in many ways: It helps them to build relationships with other people in a safe, supportive and good-humoured environment. This improves their well-being, self-esteem and confidence. In addition, the activities themselves help to improve motor skills, dexterity, co-ordination, concentration, memory skills, communication and vocal skills.

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