Registered Care Home Manager Jacky Johnson

We’re very proud of the multi-disciplinary team that we have at The Richardson Partnership for Care. The Registered Managers in particular, are hugely instrumental in delivering an excellent quality of life and successful outcomes for our service users. They perform their roles with dedication and professionalism, frequently facing challenging situations. We would like to highlight and celebrate these Managers, starting with Jacky Johnson, Registered Manager at 144 Boughton Green Road – a medium/long term home for 14 men who have acquired brain injuries and complex needs.

Jacky Johnson joined The Richardson Partnership for Care as a Registered Manager over seven years ago. She is a highly respected member of our multi-disciplinary team and we asked Consultant Neuropsychiatrist Dr Seth Mensah, who has worked with Jacky since 2016, to describe her. He said:

“I would like to single out Ms Johnson for the recognition of her professionalism, excellent leadership, hardworking attitude, positive commitment and dedication to, in particular, the residents under her care at the home.

“My very first visit to the Residential Home at 144 Boughton Green Road was in 2014 and I will never forget the very welcoming and warm reception that I received from Ms Johnson and her team. I immediately realised that this was a home unlike any other home outside of The Richardson Partnership for Care that I have visited in a professional capacity. The home felt nothing like the typical ‘institutionalised’ homes for those individuals living with intellectual disabilities and acquired brain injuries/complex neurodisability that one tends to still come across in the health and care sector. It most certainly is a place that I have heard the residents themselves feel proud to call their ‘home’ in their own words.

Leadership
“Under Ms Johnson’s leadership, a true visionary and reflective leader, the staff and carers at the home are fully supported and they feel valued and empowered to fulfil their functions and roles. This leadership style translates into a team of dedicated staff who are passionate about what they do, have an in-depth understanding of the organisational culture, fully subscribe to the vision of the organisation as a whole, and perform their duties to the highest standards of care.

“The home feels very homely and welcoming. The residents are very well looked after. Every resident has their own individually-tailored and thoroughly comprehensive care and treatment plan. Under Ms Johnson’s leadership, the carers in the home, whilst maintaining the appropriate standards of true professionalism, and embracing and practicing according to strict professional guidelines, have excellent relationships with the residents and treat them as though they were close family members. This is so endearing and always heart-warming to see, especially in light of the recent bad press that the care sector has received following the sad and unfortunate events surrounding the Winterbourne Care Home scandal.

“I have found Ms Johnson to be a skilled and competent manager, a very good listener who reflects quite deeply on all matters before she speaks, and especially so when dealing with complex matters; dealing with conflict and disagreement within the multidisciplinary team; and dealing with families, especially those who still need psychological and emotional support in their journey to coming to terms with their loved ones who are or have become residents in the home.

Compassionate approach
“Ms Johnson is the kind of manager who is both passionate about and compassionate in her role in caring for those under her care. There are numerous examples of situations where Ms Johnson has demonstrated true professionalism and positive leadership.

Ms Johnson’s selfless devotion to her chosen career, her in-depth experience and expertise in this field, her unquestionable ability to deliver (clinically and managerially) to the highest standards of care, her excellent situational leadership skills, her compassionate approach to caring for the residents under her care, her passion for prudence and excellence in the care sector, her warm and approachable nature, and her exemplary ‘man-management’ skills set her far apart from her peers. And I am sure that the residents and their families, and all the multidisciplinary team at The Richardson Partnership for Care would agree with me.”

Jacky has gained a Level 4 NVQ in Leadership and Management for Care Services and a Diploma in Brain Injury Awareness module. Jacky worked in children’s services for 14 years before transferring to adult services and she continues to maintain her registration as a Social Worker.

Alongside her role as Registered Manager at The Richardson Partnership for Care, Jacky is a MAPA (Managing Actual or Potential Aggression) instructor. She continues to strive to enhance her ongoing professional development with the use of Neuro-Linguistic Programming (NLP).

Jacky is a popular member of the team and her family is also a huge part of her life. She brings this emphasis on family life to the home that she manages, creating a warm, caring environment in which service users are respected, supported and valued.

We would like to thank Jacky for the hard work and dedication that she brings to the team and the positive impact that she has on all of the residents and staff at 144 Boughton Green Road.

Jacky Johnson

Jacky Johnson

Homes gain high scores in independent assessments

Headway Approved Providers
Two of our residential care homes for adults with acquired brain injuries – The Mews and 144 Boughton Green Road – have been recently re-assessed by Headway, the brain injury charity. The assessment process requires the home to demonstrate the provision of appropriate specialist care for people with complex, physical and/or cognitive impairment due to acquired brain injury. Headway has identified six key themes, or domains, against which it assesses the level of care provided, as well as issues such choice and dignity of service users. The domains are; Communication, Culture, Development, Governance, Quality, Environment (psychological/emotional) and Environment (physical).

We are pleased to report that both The Mews and 144 Boughton Green Road scored well in all of the domains to retain their Approved Provider Status for a further two years. This is subject to passing unannounced visits from Headway assessors during this time.

Headway Approved Provider

Quality Checkers
2&8 Kingsthorpe Grove, our homes for adults with learning disabilities, were recently assessed by Northamptonshire Quality Checkers. This is an independent assessment by an ‘expert by experience’ who meets residents in the home and performs a standardised quality check from the service users’ perspective. They are then supported by a co-ordinator to produce a report of their visit.

The Quality Checker on this occasion was Paul, who was visiting the homes for the first time. He met two service users with learning disabilities who live in the homes. One of them answered a series of questions and Paul used their answers to form the basis of his report. He gave the homes a top rating of ‘Very Good’ for all of the categories assessed, which were; home and bedroom, support staff, activities, food and drink, friends and people in the service user’s life, the service user’s health and what it’s like to live there.

Paul then asked the support staff and manager questions about procedures and safeguarding. As he was so pleased with the home, he made no recommendations for improvements to be made.

Information about other independent inspections of our care homes click here

Olivia and Jo join the psychology team

Assistant Psychologists Olivia Shepherd and Jovita Valuckaite have joined Julita Frackowska in the psychology team, which is headed up by Consultant Clinical Psychologist Dr Pedro Areias Grilo.

The Assistant Psychologists are assigned to specific service users depending on their needs and the homes in which they live. Julita supports service users in 2 & 8 Kingsthorpe Grove who have learning disabilities, autism spectrum disorders and mental health needs. Olivia works with service users at 144 Boughton Green Road and The Mews, providing psychological and practical support for people with acquired brain injuries and mental health needs, and Jo works with service users at 23 Duston Road and The Mews, supporting people with acquired brain injuries, dual diagnosis, mental health needs and behaviour that challenges.

The Assistant Psychologists perform an important role, completing psychometric assessments for service users to monitor cognition, mood, mental state and behaviour. They provide psychological reports for each individual, which include a functional analysis of their risk behaviours which is used to inform their individualised treatment plan. They also offer advice, psychological support (including cognitive behavioural therapy, cognitive stimulation therapy, substance misuse work and relaxation) as well as providing practical support such as budgeting and functional living skills.

Consultant Clinical Psychologist Dr Pedro Areias Grilo heads the psychology team. He is an inspiration to his colleagues due to his work ethic and methodical approach but most of all, he is immensely passionate about making a difference to service users. He works closely with other members of our multi-disciplinary clinical team, especially Consultant Neuropsychiatrist Dr Seth Mensah, to develop individualised treatment plans for service users. He also works directly with the service users to provide therapy, supporting them and monitoring their progress. In addition, Pedro oversees the work of the Assistant Psychologists, both supporting them in their role to deliver therapy and complete standard assessments but also challenging them academically to find better ways of working.

Olivia Shepherd and Jovita Valuckaite

From left to right: Assistant Psychologists Olivia Shepherd and Jovita Valuckaite

European Neuro Convention – 7 & 8 June 2017

At this time of year, members of our admissions and referrals team and some of our senior managers are getting out and about across the country at various events. In June, we’re taking part in the European Neuro Convention at ExCeL London.

The European Neuro Convention is Europe’s largest event of its kind, aimed at medical professionals working in the rehabilitation of neurological conditions. Educational seminars, workshops and networking are run alongside an exhibition of around 150 companies.

CPD points can be earned in the educationally-focused seminar schedule and interactive workshops and live demos will take place.

Neuro Rehab runs alongside COPA Practice Growth and Elite Sports Therapy & Medical Rehabilitation and tickets provide entry into all three shows. They are available for free at www.neuroconvention.com or by calling 0117 929 6092.

We’d love you to come and see us at stand 9020 in the exhibition.

European Neuro Convention 2017

Free Tickets for Social Care Conference

Our admissions and referrals team, along with our senior managers, attend various exhibitions and conferences in the fields of social care, learning disability and brain injury rehabilitation. They take place all over the country and enable us to stay up to date with the latest developments and meet experts in related fields.

We are taking part in the exhibition at The Future of Social Care Conference: Integrated care solutions and we have been allocated a limited number of free conference places (worth £325 + VAT each). We’re offering them to our contacts on a first come, first served basis. Please contact us if you would like a ticket.

The event takes place on 16 May 2017, at Adelphi House, University of Salford. At the conference, leading experts will offer unique insights into new models of care and the latest developments in government policy aimed at meeting the ever-increasing demands on the social care sector in the UK.

Topics covered on the day will include:

  • How will the additional £2 billion of funding announced in the spring budget be allocated and what impact will it have?
  • What structural changes will be needed to overhaul the social care system?
  • What is the New Care Models Programme and what implications does it have for social care?
  • What impact is the crisis in social care having on the NHS?
  • How could closer integration of primary and acute care ease the pressure on the social care system?
  • How will STPs address the fragmented nature of the health and social care sectors?
  • How can new technology be used to improve the quality of social care?

If you’re going along, please come and see us at the exhibition on the ground floor, stand AH005.

National Learning Disability & Autism Awards 2016

We are delighted to have been shortlisted as finalists in the National Learning Disability and Autism Awards 2016 in the Employer Award category.

In order for us to provide a consistently high quality of service to the people in our care, we recognise that we need to have skilled, caring and hard-working employees who are dedicated to their work. It is only fair that we support them as best we can and help them to gain the skills that they need to progress in their roles, and this is what we always aim to do.

What makes us different?
Dr Pedro Areias Grilo, a Consultant Clinical Psychologist has worked at The Richardson Partnership for Care since 2014 and has a substantial array of clinical experience, both in the private and public healthcare sectors. This allows him to have significant insight and awareness about the services that we offer to meet effectively the needs of individuals we cater for. He has highlighted what makes The Richardson Partnership for Care stand out against other care homes.

Supporting staff
The Richardson Partnership for Care (RPC) is on the forefront of care offered in the UK and is currently able to offer, meet and surpass the needs of all individuals they cater for. They strive to go the extra mile to effectively support people. How? They empower staff to strive and accomplish. They develop their staff through in-house weekly training sessions, weekly reflective practice facilitated by Consultant Clinical Psychologists, effective supervision and open-door practice. Likewise, staff feel skilled, supported, cared, involved and motivated to deliver outstanding care and to strive on their roles. The professional satisfaction, sense of belonging and ability to acknowledge what needs to be done to support individuals in need is immense. This impacts positively on the care being delivered. The individuals’ lives change immensely and they feel they are part of a family, rather than people just “living” in a place. They have a home, a family, a social network and happiness. This is what care is about: Enhancement of life quality. The Richardson Partnership for Care without any doubts, offers this and much more.

Multi-disciplinary team
RPC also employs a Multidisciplinary team (MDT), currently offering to the individuals they support an in-house Consultant Neuropsychiatrist, two Consultants Clinical Psychologists, one part-time and one full-time Assistant Psychologist, one Occupational Therapist, one Physiotherapist and one Speech and Language Therapist. I must say, this is extraordinary. As evidenced, RPC has the ability to offer in-house clinicians to immediately and efficiently meet all the needs of the individuals they support.

Innovations
There are also constant innovations. The MDT and Registered Home Managers meet frequently to evaluate the best treatment and intervention plans to support the individuals they cater for. In-house treatment directories were developed, based on NICE guidelines and clinical evidence, to effectively meet and support individuals’ needs. This makes a substantial difference in terms of care being delivered.

I believe RPC could offer what the majority of other organizations do. But no. They have decided to take the hard route. The route that requires an outstanding commitment, the route that might bring discussions, challenges, the route that brings changes, the route that takes people out of their comfort zone. However, this is the route to excellence, which RPC is and will continue to follow.

Greg and Laura are far ahead of their time. They have a clear understanding of the service they offer and where it must go. They have the individuals’ care on the centre of their hearts and the awareness and rationality to observe, analyze, discuss and establish action plans to meet individuals’ needs. This makes the difference and impacts substantially on the service being delivered. This brings innovation and positive changes to care services in the UK.

Dr Pedro Areias Grilo
Consultant Clinical Psychologist
Birmingham University Honorary Tutor

What makes RPC different?

CQC Inspection for The Mews

An unannounced inspection took place at The Mews, one of our homes for adults with acquired brain injuries, in January. The Mews was rated ‘Good’ against all of the five key questions:  Is the service safe? Is the service effective? Is the service caring? Is the service responsive? Is the service well-led? Additional evidence was obtained to produce a full report, which you can access here

The Richardson Mews

The Mews. The Richardson Partnership for Care

Residential care in the heart of the community

There is much debate on whether community-based support is better than ‘institutional care’ but of course, it depends on the individual. It also depends on the type of care and support. One of the best ways to describe our specialist residential care homes is ‘a place that feels like home’. Yes, we deliver effective intensive short-term rehabilitation and long-term rehabilitation for adults with acquired brain injury. We also provide care and support for adults with learning difficulties and behaviour that challenges. And we have a high support worker to service user ratio, but we strive to provide an environment that feels like a home, not an institution. It’s safe, comfortable and homely. Our homes provide companionship, and protect vulnerable people from social isolation, loneliness and hate crime.

Community engagement
We also enable service users to be part of the local community. All of our care homes in Northampton are situated close to local shops and facilities, as well as within easy access to the town centre. For service users who are able to, popping out to the local shops means that they feel part of the local community and ‘normal’, especially when they see people they know. It’s also part of our focus on ‘normalisation’ for service users with an acquired brain injury. Enabling them to live as close to a normal life as possible is an important part of their rehabilitation.

We are fortunate that we have some great local pubs where the staff understand the needs of our service users and are very welcoming and helpful. In December we held a 60th birthday party for a service user at the local pub. Donald enjoyed a lovely meal with his sister, all his fellow service users from his home and members of staff. He’s been living in our care home for over 20 years and it was a really lovely occasion. And the pub staff even sang ‘Happy Birthday’ to him!

Donald's birthday cakeCompany ethos
As well as everyday trips to the shops and special occasions, there are also trips to the cinema, sports centres and cafés. They help every service user to become familiar with their local environment and make them feel at home. It’s all part of the ethos of The Richardson Partnership for Care, ensuring that service users are treated with dignity and respect, actively supported to make their own choices and given the opportunity to participate in community activities.

Donald and his sister

Donald with his sister at his birthday party

Selina gains Level 4 Diploma in Adult Care

Congratulations to Selina Vernon, Assessor and Review Co-ordinator at our homes for adults with learning difficulties, who has completed her Level 4 Diploma in Adult Care. This is a new qualification and Selina is the first person to pass it in the UK with training and qualifications body ARC (Association for Real Change).

It was recognised that there was a need for senior people in the residential care sector who were not registered managers but wanted to gain a management qualification. This Level 4 Diploma in Adult Care fills the gap below the new Level 5 Leadership qualification and covers areas such as:

  • Advanced communication skills
  • Implementing equality and diversity policies
  • Facilitating support planning to ensure positive outcomes for individuals and to support well-being
Selina Vernon

Selina Vernon has achieved the new Level 4 Diploma in Adult Care

Selina achieved her qualification by assessment in the workplace with support and quality assurance/verification from ARC. Selina commented: “After completing my assessors’ award, I wanted to develop my knowledge further to be able to better support the individuals in my care and also my candidates. The level 4 was a natural progression with a good range of units to cater for different care environments. The units were relevant and required me to push myself in order to develop my knowledge to achieve the diploma. The support I received from ARC was fantastic.”

Congratulations also go to Joanna Okoro, Mike Femi Ayenitaju and Ranga Gorejena who have achieved Level 3 Diplomas in Health and Social Care.

At The Richardson Partnership for Care our aim to enable people to realise their potential, applies to our staff as well as our service users. Staff are given the opportunity, encouragement and support to build their knowledge and confidence and to better meet the diverse needs of all of the individuals that we care for. As well as the opportunity to take a range of qualifications, all support staff complete a comprehensive training schedule which involves them attending training every three weeks as part of their working rota. This includes statutory training such as health and safety and food hygiene as well as crisis prevention, epilepsy, dementia and working with people with learning disabilities. More information on our training schedule can be found here:

For more information about the qualification, go to the ARC website.

Feedback from Service Users’ families

At The Richardson Partnership for Care we strive to provide an open environment, welcoming feedback from service users’ families about the care of their loved ones. We also complete an annual survey, which provides family members with a more formal opportunity to tell us about their views on the care, support and rehabilitation services that we provide for adults with acquired brain injuries and learning difficulties.

The survey is entirely optional and consequently the number of responses can be quite small. However, we are very proud of the feedback that we have received.

100% of respondents strongly agreed or agreed with the statement:
“I am happy with the care provided”

100% of respondents strongly agreed or agreed with the statement:
“I feel that my relative is treated with dignity and respect”

100% of respondents strongly agreed or agreed with the statement:
“I feel that their quality of life has improved since they arrived at The Richardson Partnership for Care”

100% of respondents said that they would recommend The Richardson Partnership for Care

93% of respondents strongly agreed or agreed with the statement:
“The home has a warm, non-institutional feeling.”

93% of respondents strongly agreed or agreed with the statement:
“The home has an inclusive or family environment.”

We scored less highly on updating service users’ families with information – only 69% of respondents strongly agreed or agreed with the statement: “I am regularly updated with information.” This is therefore something for us to focus on and improve upon.

We were pleased to receive the following comments:

“All staff are great and some exceptional.”

“His life quality has improved considerably over the last 11.5 years. He lives in a calm, comfortable, caring, clean environment where he is encouraged to relax – waylaying his self-harm and anxiety”

“His life skills have developed from him being nervous and frightened to a confident and happy man.”

“Our thanks as a family for our daughter’s care and treatment.”

“He is very well cared for by professional carers who not only meet his needs, but work to challenge him to develop his social skills.”

We would like to thank all of the family members who took the time to complete our annual survey. If you would like any further information about our services, please contact us.