Celebrating 30 Years!

We recently celebrated our 30th anniversary with a garden party for service users, their families, staff and guests. Everyone was invited to take part in traditional games and activities such as tombola, bean bag throwing and ‘pin the tail on the donkey’, while enjoying entertainment from the Northampton Ukulele group and Martin the Music Man. A celebration cake was cut by service user, Denise, who has learning disabilities, helped by Dawn Briggs, an Administrator, who has been with Richardson Care for 24 years. The cake was then cut again by Emil, who has an acquired brain injury, and Managing Partner, Greg Richardson-Cheater.

We have a fantastic team at Richardson Care, and this was an opportunity to celebrate this amazing achievement and say thank you. It was a fabulous day with a happy, relaxed atmosphere, which is indicative of the family environment that we aim to create in our homes.

As a family business and one of the few independently owned and run specialist care providers in the country, we’re very proud to reach this milestone. I’m sure our longevity and success are due to remaining true to the values that my parents established back in 1989. We believe that social inclusion, community participation, dignity and respect, combined with tailored therapeutic input are key to enabling service users to fulfil their potential. We never forget that we’re all here because of the service users and we deliver truly person-centred care.

Thirty years is a long time in the care sector, and we have achieved this by not standing still. We are continually looking to the future and are innovative in our approach to supporting adults with complex needs and behaviours that challenge, delivering positive outcomes for the people in our care. This year has also seen the opening of our sixth residential care home: We now have three homes for adults with acquired brain injuries and three for adults with learning disabilities, all providing specialist care. Thank you to everyone who is part of the Richardson Care family.

The Coach House is now a Home

The Coach House, our new residential care home for adults with acquired brain injuries in Northampton, has now completed its CQC registration process and welcomed its first service users. Initially registered for nine beds, The Coach House adds to our portfolio of services by providing longer term slow-stream brain injury rehabilitation, which is often appropriate for people after an initial period of intensive rehabilitation or post-acute care.

As with all of our homes, our aim is to create a place that will feel like home (not like a medical or institutional setting) for the service users who live here. In our thirty years of experience, a warm, homely environment helps service users to engage more in their rehabilitation and have a better quality of life.

Jo Wilkins

Meet Jo Wilkins

Jo Wilkins is the Registered Homes Manager at The Coach House and joined The Richardson Partnership for Care in December 2018. She has worked in the neurological sector for 20 years, and is well-respected amongst her peers, so you may have already met her. You can read more about Jo here.

Why our care homes are in Northampton

We have six specialist residential care homes: three for adults with learning disabilities and three for adults with acquired brain injuries, and all of our homes cater for people who present with behaviour that challenges and have complex needs. All of our homes are located within a few miles of each other in Northampton, and we are often asked why this is the case.

The answer is two-fold. Firstly, Northampton is our home town. My parents started the business back in 1989 when they looked after service users with learning disabilities in their own home, and it grew from there. Having all the homes in Northampton means that we can more be aware of what’s happening in each one. As the owners of the business, we need to ensure its long-term sustainability and that we remain true to our values and objectives. We also need to be confident that we are providing a high-quality service on a day-to-day basis. Being close by helps us to stay in touch with what’s happening in each home. Too many care companies are owned by private equity firms, who view success in terms of profit alone, and not by the welfare and achievements of the people in their care.

Belonging to a community

Having the homes located close together also means that they share resources more easily: members of our multi-disciplinary team of therapists work with service users in all of our homes, so they are much more accessible. In addition, we can provide greater opportunities to service users. They can get together for activities such as short-mat bowling, live music events or parties. It helps them to feel part of a bigger community, increasing social interaction and building confidence.

A hub for neuro specialists

Secondly, Northampton has evolved as a hub for the treatment and care of people with neurological conditions, particularly brain injuries. Consequently, there is a high concentration of specialist care providers for people with acquired brain injuries, learning disabilities or mental health needs. This means that there is a range of a care options to suit individual needs, and The Richardson Partnership for Care forms part of the care pathway. We can also work in partnership with other support services if crisis care is required, providing continuity for service users and improving outcomes.

This specialism in the neurosciences and related care draws neuro experts to Northampton, which also means that there is a larger pool of talented and experienced people in this area. This makes it easier to recruit the right people to deliver the high-quality support that we provide.

Maintaining family relationships

In addition, Northampton’s location in the centre of England, and at the heart of the motorway network, makes it easy to access from most parts of the country. However, we appreciate that many families may still find it difficult to visit their loved ones in our homes. We can therefore include supported home visits as part of the individual’s care plan. This helps them to maintain or rebuild their relationship with their family, which is important for their well-being.

Person-centred care

Although there are many benefits to being in Northampton, we believe that location is just one of a range of factors to consider. What is best for the individual is what counts – the care and therapy provided, the environment, the community and the opportunities for social inclusion and fulfilment. Placing the service user at the centre of the decision-making process is crucial.

Watch our video

Click on the link below to watch the video that was filmed at the opening of The Coach House, our new residential care and rehabilitation home for adults with long-term brain injuries and complex needs. It encapsulates the essence of our organisation and the homes that we provide for our service users.

The Coach House video

Liam cutting the ribbon to open The Coach House
Liam, a brain injury survivor and former service user, cut the ribbon to formally open The Coach House

Our new residential care and rehab home opens

Liam Prior, cuts the ribbon to officially open the brain injury rehab home
Brain injury survivor, and former service user, Liam Prior performs the opening ceremony

After months of hard work, we’re very pleased to announce that our new residential care and rehab home, The Coach House, is finally complete. To celebrate, we welcomed back Liam Prior to perform a ribbon cutting ceremony and officially open the home. Liam was the first person to move into The Mews (our adjacent home for adults with acquired brain injuries) back in December 2010. He has since moved out into his own flat in Northampton but still keeps in touch with the team at The Mews, and often comes back for Christmas dinner. It was great to see him on such good form and to be reminded of his sense of humour!

Greg Richardson-Cheater, Dr Seth Mensah, Jo Throp, Pedro Areias Grilo and Jo Wilkins
From left to right: Greg Richardson-Cheater, Dr Seth Mensah, Jo Throp, Pedro Areias Grilo, Jo Wilkins

We opened the doors of The Coach House to around 40 brain injury professionals, social workers and representatives from the NHS and Clinical Commissioning Groups. They were entertained and informed by presentations by senior members of the multi-disciplinary team (MDT) here at The Richardson Partnership for Care including Dr Seth Mensah, Consultant Neuropsychiatrist and Pedro Areias Grilo, Consultant Clinical Psychologist, along with Jo Throp, Neurological Occupational Therapist and Clinical Director at Krysalis Consultancy.

After the presentations, Simon the Saxophonist provided background music while everyone had lunch and the opportunity to look around The Coach House and The Mews, and to meet members of our team.

We wanted to give everyone the opportunity to understand more about what makes us different to other residential care and rehab environments. The physical environment that we provide is high quality, comfortable and homely as well as safe and practical. It’s always been important to us that our homes actually feel like home to the people who live here, and a lot of thought has gone into the details. It is a deliberate policy that the homes do not look like institutional settings and that staff don’t wear uniforms. But this doesn’t mean that we don’t have a clinical approach to support and rehabilitation. We have some high calibre neuro specialists in our team, and we are proud of our unique approach that delivers positive outcomes for our service users.

Accommodation details
• Nine ground-floor bedrooms, plus two on the first floor
• All have ensuite level-access wetrooms, designed to be both stylish and practical
• Two rooms have kitchenette facilities
• Seven rooms have their own patio area
•Three different light settings are available, depending on the needs of the individual – daylight, warm, cool – all with dimmer switches
• TV, wi-fi and the option of satellite TV

Communal rooms
• Kitchen with modern appliances and plenty of storage space
• Modern, spacious dining room
• Light, comfortable lounge area, plus additional seating areas
• Easy access to shared facilities at the Mews
• Latest environmental measures to increase energy efficiency and reduce running costs

In addition, The Coach House has plenty of natural light, high ceilings, spacious bedrooms and living areas, as well as vibrant décor and views of the gardens. These all contribute to enhancing the mood and well-being of service users.

Please call us on 01604 791266 to arrange a visit.

New Acquired Brain Injury Care Home Opening

We’re pleased to announce the launch of The Coach House – our new residential care and rehabilitation service for 11 adults with acquired brain injuries. And to celebrate, we’re holding an Open Day on Thursday 24th January, 2019.

The Coach House is a self-contained home in the grounds of The Mews, another of our specialist residential care homes in Kingsthorpe, Northampton. We’ve spent a lot of time, thought and effort in creating the best environment we can to help people recover from brain injuries and rebuild their lives. We believe that designing a home that is accessible, practical and safe does not mean that it can’t also be cosy, comfortable and feel like home. In fact, we believe this is crucial to service users’ well-being and their engagement in their own rehabilitation plan.

We have some fantastic speakers involved in the event, so please come along to celebrate the opening of the Coach House, meet the team at The Richardson Partnership for Care and find out more about brain injury rehabilitation.

Open Day Programme

9.30am – arrival and coffee
10.00am – 1.00pm – presentations and discussions

Dr Seth A. Mensah, MB ChB, MSc, DPM, MRCPsych – Consultant Neuropsychiatrist
“The Brain and Human Behaviour – What has Phineas Gage taught us?”

Pedro Areias Grilo, HCPC, MSc – Consultant Clinical Psychologist
“Positive Behavioural Tool – capturing positive behaviours in neurorehabilitation”

Jo Throp – Neurological Occupational Therapist and Clinical Director at Krysalis Consultancy
“The Brain and its Function from the Perspective of a Neuro-Occupational Therapist”

1.00pm ribbon cutting, lunch and tour of facilities
2.00pm close

Please reply to Sian.Richardson@careresidential.co.uk or call her on 01604 791071 for more information.

The Coach House residential home for adults with acquired brain injuries

The Coach House, Kingsthorpe, Northampton NN2 7PW

Activities for adults with acquired brain injuries

Building confidence and self-esteem
As well as specific therapeutic inputs, such as occupational therapy, physiotherapy and psychology sessions, service users in our care can also choose to take part in a range of activities each week, depending on their needs and abilities. These activities include music sessions, arts and crafts, ASDAN learning sessions, swimming, visiting local cafes, shops, etc. Not only are they fun and enjoyable activities in their own right, but they are also important in providing a ‘normal’ lifestyle and they support the therapeutic regime provided by the Multi-Disciplinary Team.

One popular activity for several of our service users with acquired brain injuries is Rock Club. It brings together people using different brain injury services in Northamptonshire to take part in a wide range of different activities: Anything from a disco and karaoke night to a bake-off competition, film night or quiz.

Halloween is a big event and the fancy dress disco is eagerly anticipated. Sallie Maris, the Arts and Crafts Co-ordinator at The Richardson Partnership for Care helped some of the service users prepare their Halloween costumes, which was all part of the fun.

Dressing up for HalloweenPreparing for the Halloween party

The Rock Club summer fun day was also a big occasion, with a barbecue, side shows and a visit from ‘Party Animals’ – an organisation that enables people to have close encounters with reptiles, rodents and mammals so they can learn more about them, overcome their fears and build confidence. Terry, one of our service users with an acquired brain injury was inspired to create this poster after the Rock Club summer fun day because he enjoyed it so much.

Terry's Rock Club poster

Rock Club events are held in Northamptonshire every other month, but the benefits extend to both before and after each occasion, and they are just part of the programme of activities included in the care plans for our service users.

As well as being very enjoyable, a varied activity schedule is important to service users in many ways: It helps them to build relationships with other people in a safe, supportive and good-humoured environment. This improves their well-being, self-esteem and confidence. In addition, the activities themselves help to improve motor skills, dexterity, co-ordination, concentration, memory skills, communication and vocal skills.

Brain injury rehabilitation – Kay’s story

Kay - brain injury survivor

Kay has transformed her life with the help of the MDT and support staff at The Richardson Partnership for Care

When she was only 18 months old, Kay contracted Encephalitis and consequently experienced severe epilepsy. At the age of 13, she underwent surgery on her frontal lobe, which further exacerbated the brain damage. Kay also has a diagnosis of moderate learning disability.

Kay lived at home with her mother and grandmother before moving to specialist residential schools and other settings. At the age of 27, Kay moved to The Mews at The Richardson Partnership for Care. She had previously resided in a private hospital, but the placement broke down due to her risk behaviours and the inability to manage Kay in that environment.

Behaviour on Admission to The Richardson Partnership for Care
Kay’s challenging behaviour was thought to be underpinned by poor impulsivity control and a reactive approach to challenging situations due to her brain injury.

On admission, Kay presented with severe verbal and physical aggression towards herself and others. She also would make false allegations towards staff and other residents, disregarding staff prompts and instructions compromising her and others’ overall safety.

Kay was offered a holistic approach to help her to manage her challenging behaviour and become more self-aware. With the support of the multi-disciplinary team at The Richardson Partnership for Care and her care support workers, Kay has transformed her quality of life.

Read Kay’s brain injury rehabilitation case study in full here

Our new residential care home – update

The excitement is building as our new residential care home and rehabilitation centre gets closer to completion. The Coach House is a listed building in the grounds of one of our existing care homes, and it hadn’t been used for many years. It is being renovated and extended and will soon become a new residential care home and rehabilitation centre for 11 adults with acquired brain injuries.

The scaffolding is down and a large team of trades people are busily working away inside. Doors are being hung, skirting boards and architraves fitted; The underfloor heating is in and floors are being tiled, and wet-rooms fitted out.

The terrace has been laid outside the bedrooms and the fine weather has meant that we’ve made good progress on the groundworks, so we’ll soon be in a position to show round visitors – we’ll keep you posted!

The Coach House - exterior

The Coach House – exterior

The Coach House - terraces

The Coach House – terraces

Sad news and tribute to Brian Richardson

Brian Richardson

Brian Richardson

This month we pay tribute to my dad, Brian Richardson, who has died after a short illness: He was diagnosed with Lymphoma in his brain in April this year. Brian was the driving force behind The Richardson Partnership for Care, which he founded with my mum, Jackie, in 1989.

Brian was an amazing man who touched the lives and hearts of so many people. He was born on Christmas Eve 1949 and grew up in humble surroundings in Northampton with his parents and two brothers. His entrepreneurial spirit was evident from a young age when he would devise enterprising schemes, which included repairing motorbikes on the lawn in front of the family home.

After leaving school Brian attended the newly opened Nene College in Northampton and qualified as a teacher, however he didn’t quite fit into the teaching world. Instead he came home with a teenage student who desperately needed short-term foster care and that was the beginning of his career as a carer.

Brian and Jackie started The Richardson Partnership for Care in their own home, caring for people with learning disabilities. In fact, two of the people that they looked after then are still residents in our care homes now, almost thirty years later. They built up the business with love, sheer hard work, determination and dedication; qualities that Brian also displayed in his personal and social life.

Brian and Jackie grew the business by buying up properties in Northampton to enable them to care for more people. They also recognised there was a need for specialist residential care and rehabilitation for people with acquired brain injuries, so extended the services to care for them too. I grew up in the business and have worked full time for The Richardson Partnership for Care since leaving school. Around 15-20 years ago, I was appointed a Director, and Brian and Jackie gradually stepped down from the day to day running of the business, handing over to me and my husband Greg.

The Richardson Partnership for Care is very much Brian’s legacy. He and Jackie established it to feel more like a family than a business. Brian was more than a boss to his employees – he was a true friend and a gentleman. He was known for his generosity, often helping people out when they didn’t expect it and investing in their personal development. He gave them the skills and the freedom to move on, but many of the staff chose to stay. This is still the case today.

Part of Brian’s legacy is also the ethos of The Richardson Partnership for Care and its commitment to providing a warm, friendly and positive environment for people with learning disabilities and acquired brain injuries. They are treated with dignity and respect and we aim to support them to realise their potential and live a fulfilling life.
Brian was a man who lived life to the full. He had many friends and a wide range of interests. As a youngster he would go to the Salon ballroom with his parents where he achieved gold medals for Ballroom and Latin American Dancing, and in later years he would love to Rock and Roll and Salsa with Jackie and Laura. He also loved the outdoors: he enjoyed walking and fishing, but his great passion was stalking and shooting. He was also a confident and extremely competent diver, as well as fast and enthusiastic skier. He was a risk-taker and had a reputation for a having a dare-devil attitude, which is perhaps why he was so much fun.

Brian was a warm and generous host and loved cooking for friends and family. He has been described as kind, caring, friendly, funny, a life-long friend, supportive, great company, interesting, intelligent, daring, obstinate and even, eccentric. We will miss him dearly, but we endeavour to maintain the ethos and vision for The Richardson Partnership for Care that Brian and Jackie established.