Satisfaction survey: our care home residents

Adults with acquired brain injuries, learning disabilities and complex needs

In addition to surveying the families of service users in our care on an annual basis, we also complete a questionnaire with the individuals themselves, which asks specific questions about different aspects of their lives within the care home. They are asked to respond using a satisfaction rating of 0 – 4 where 4 is the most satisfied. All of our service users have complex needs and some are unable to answer the questions, so staff either help them to answer the questions or observe their behaviours to ascertain their needs.

The results from each individual are combined to give average scores, which are shown below. There are up to five questions in each section, so the totals show an indication of satisfaction in each area.

However, as every person is different, and has different needs, our approach is always individualised, person-centred care.

bar chart showing satisfaction survey results

Service user satisfaction survey results 2017

The following gives you more information about the specific areas covered in the satisfaction survey.

Know how to complain
This question assesses how well the individual knows what to do if they have a complaint. The average overall score across the homes was 3.63 out of 4. It excludes the individuals who were unable to understand the question.

People you live with
This is very important to all of our service users, and satisfaction ratings can vary according to the type of care home as stable populations with long term residents tend to have a higher satisfaction rating. The Mews, which focuses on short-term intensive rehabilitation for adults with acquired brain injuries, naturally has more of a changing population. This can affect the dynamics of relationships between the residents. We work hard to ensure that any incoming service users will not upset the balance in any care home and we continually review our admissions policy to ensure that we receive sufficient information in advance of a full assessment of any potential new residents.

There is very much a family environment within our care homes, and many strong friendships develop between individuals. However, like a family, it doesn’t mean that everyone gets on well with everyone else all the time. Therefore it is important that we focus on relationships between individuals and use mediation and psychology to manage any disagreements. As a last resort, we can move individuals into another of our homes but this is rarely necessary.

Decision making
These questions covered how involved people feel in decisions relating to their care plan and risk assessments as well as making choices in their everyday lives.

Staffing
These questions ascertain how well service users know the support staff in their home and how they feel that they are treated by them: whether the staff are approachable, as well as whether they would like to be involved in the interview process. Many service users said that they would not want to be involved, which has reduced the average score.

Food and drink
As well as being asked about their choice of food and their cultural needs, individuals were also asked about how involved they wanted to be in menu planning and food preparation.

Activities
Many of these questions were qualitative: describing current activities undertaken or potential new ones, so a numerical score was not given. The activities that we provide are very much tailored to the individual and if something is requested but not achievable or affordable then we explore alternatives.

Environment
These questions simply asked how satisfied service users are with the communal areas of the home, the garden and their room.

Families’ survey results 2017

We encourage feedback from the families of the service users in our care on a regular basis, but once a year we formalise this process by sending them a short questionnaire to complete. It is sent to both the families of service users who have learning disabilities and those who have an acquired brain injury. We ask all families whether they strongly agree, agree, don’t know or disagree with the following statements:

1. I am happy with the care provided for my relative
2. The home has a warm, non-institutional feeling
3. The home provides an inclusive or family environment
4. Staff are friendly and approachable
5. I am regularly updated with information
6. I feel that my relative is treated with dignity and respect
7. I feel that their quality of life has improved since they arrived at The Richardson Partnership for Care
8. I feel that my relative takes part in meaningful and/or enjoyable activities
9. Would you recommend The Richardson Partnership for Care?

We are very pleased that:
100% of respondents strongly agreed or agreed with the statements: “I am happy with the care provided” and “The home has a warm, non-institutional feeling.”

And 100% of those who answered said that they would recommend The Richardson Partnership for Care to others.

We take note of all the feedback and we’re not complacent, making sure that we address any concerns raised. The responses to each question are show below:

graph showing 2017 survey results

2017 Survey results

We would like to thank all of the family members who took the time to complete our annual survey, and we are delighted with some of the comments that we have received. Some of them are shown below with the names removed to protect the identity of the service users.

Comments from families of service users with learning disabilities:

“He has been there over 20 years. Quality of life could not be better.”

“The home is friendly and welcoming, the other residents are pleasant and friendly… They know her so well and it is her second family, and when we visit we are welcomed… She gets help and support from all and she is treated with respect and love… I have no problem recommending your services, they are outstanding.”

“He has progressed so much this year, being able to go on holiday and attend social events… He realises he is cared for well and that he is valued within his community… He is like a new man, he was very dependent on drug therapy when he arrived at Richardson’s. Your care has enabled him to flourish and grow… the social and psychological stimulation helps him make progress. We would like to thank you for all your highly skilled and sensitive work with him.”

Comments from families of service users with acquired brain injury:

“Excellent care that has made a positive difference to my husband and his demeanour… Importantly staff display a warmth, empathy and understanding towards my husband…Thank you. Your care of my husband has made a big difference to his quality of life.”

“I have always been very happy with the care my sister has… Although she is not much of a mixer, there is a good family atmosphere… She has very challenging behaviour but I think she has the best quality of life possible… As long as she has been with the Richardson Partnership, she has only ever got the best care possible.”

 

Residential care in the heart of the community

There is much debate on whether community-based support is better than ‘institutional care’ but of course, it depends on the individual. It also depends on the type of care and support. One of the best ways to describe our specialist residential care homes is ‘a place that feels like home’. Yes, we deliver effective intensive short-term rehabilitation and long-term rehabilitation for adults with acquired brain injury. We also provide care and support for adults with learning difficulties and behaviour that challenges. And we have a high support worker to service user ratio, but we strive to provide an environment that feels like a home, not an institution. It’s safe, comfortable and homely. Our homes provide companionship, and protect vulnerable people from social isolation, loneliness and hate crime.

Community engagement
We also enable service users to be part of the local community. All of our care homes in Northampton are situated close to local shops and facilities, as well as within easy access to the town centre. For service users who are able to, popping out to the local shops means that they feel part of the local community and ‘normal’, especially when they see people they know. It’s also part of our focus on ‘normalisation’ for service users with an acquired brain injury. Enabling them to live as close to a normal life as possible is an important part of their rehabilitation.

We are fortunate that we have some great local pubs where the staff understand the needs of our service users and are very welcoming and helpful. In December we held a 60th birthday party for a service user at the local pub. Donald enjoyed a lovely meal with his sister, all his fellow service users from his home and members of staff. He’s been living in our care home for over 20 years and it was a really lovely occasion. And the pub staff even sang ‘Happy Birthday’ to him!

Donald's birthday cakeCompany ethos
As well as everyday trips to the shops and special occasions, there are also trips to the cinema, sports centres and cafés. They help every service user to become familiar with their local environment and make them feel at home. It’s all part of the ethos of The Richardson Partnership for Care, ensuring that service users are treated with dignity and respect, actively supported to make their own choices and given the opportunity to participate in community activities.

Donald and his sister

Donald with his sister at his birthday party

Feedback from Service Users’ families

At The Richardson Partnership for Care we strive to provide an open environment, welcoming feedback from service users’ families about the care of their loved ones. We also complete an annual survey, which provides family members with a more formal opportunity to tell us about their views on the care, support and rehabilitation services that we provide for adults with acquired brain injuries and learning difficulties.

The survey is entirely optional and consequently the number of responses can be quite small. However, we are very proud of the feedback that we have received.

100% of respondents strongly agreed or agreed with the statement:
“I am happy with the care provided”

100% of respondents strongly agreed or agreed with the statement:
“I feel that my relative is treated with dignity and respect”

100% of respondents strongly agreed or agreed with the statement:
“I feel that their quality of life has improved since they arrived at The Richardson Partnership for Care”

100% of respondents said that they would recommend The Richardson Partnership for Care

93% of respondents strongly agreed or agreed with the statement:
“The home has a warm, non-institutional feeling.”

93% of respondents strongly agreed or agreed with the statement:
“The home has an inclusive or family environment.”

We scored less highly on updating service users’ families with information – only 69% of respondents strongly agreed or agreed with the statement: “I am regularly updated with information.” This is therefore something for us to focus on and improve upon.

We were pleased to receive the following comments:

“All staff are great and some exceptional.”

“His life quality has improved considerably over the last 11.5 years. He lives in a calm, comfortable, caring, clean environment where he is encouraged to relax – waylaying his self-harm and anxiety”

“His life skills have developed from him being nervous and frightened to a confident and happy man.”

“Our thanks as a family for our daughter’s care and treatment.”

“He is very well cared for by professional carers who not only meet his needs, but work to challenge him to develop his social skills.”

We would like to thank all of the family members who took the time to complete our annual survey. If you would like any further information about our services, please contact us.

The Mews awarded 10/10 in Quality Checkers report

Voice Ability is an advocacy service providing independent advocacy for people aged over 18. The organisation supports people who use adult mental health care services with issues about mental health and social care.

Voice Ability also provides a quality checking service for a range of organisations including Northamptonshire County Council, the CQC and NHS Trusts. Their ‘experts by experience’ take part in quality assessments from a service user’s perspective.

Northamptonshire Quality Checkers recently assessed The Mews, one of our homes providing rehabilitation and residential care for adults with acquired brain injuries. Mike, the Quality Checker, had a look around the home and spoke with service users and staff. He said that he was made to feel very welcome, and the service users that he spoke to said that the house was very ‘homely’ and that the food was ‘delish’! They also told him about the activities in which they are involved: one service user does paid admin work at the home and another is starting a college course to study animals.

An area of key importance to Voice Ability is that service users have the freedom to make their own choices and are supported to take informed risks. The brain injury rehabilitation service provided at The Mews, aims to increase the independence of all service users and these elements of decision making are an important part of this rehabilitation process.

Mike also discovered that service users at The Mews have communication passports and hospital passports and that everyone has health action plans in their care plans. He awarded The Mews 10 out of 10 in his report.

We welcome independent assessments from all types of organisation, listening objectively to all feedback from third parties, service users, their families and our staff. We endeavour to continually improve the quality of life for people in our homes and the effectiveness of our rehabilitation services, wherever possible.

Bedroom at The Richardson Partnership for Care

A bedroom at The Mews

144 Boughton Green Road regains Headway Accreditation

No two brain injuries are the same, as no two individuals are the same, so our specialist residential care homes need to cater for people with different needs. Service users may come to us several years after they have sustained a brain injury and after they have already had a period of acute rehabilitation. We continue their rehabilitation, working steadily and patiently with them to help them achieve their goals, recognising that it may take longer for them to reach their maximum potential.

Many of the service users at our home at 144 Boughton Green Road receive slow stream rehabilitation and long-term support. In 2013, the home received Headway Approved Provider status, following an assessment against a range of standards that reflect the specific needs of people with acquired brain injury. In June this year, Headway reassessed 144 Boughton Green Road and the home passed with flying colours. The accreditation has been extended by a further two years, subject to passing unannounced visits from Headway assessors.

Headway Approved Provider logoThe assessment process requires the home to demonstrate the provision of appropriate specialist care for people with complex, physical and/or cognitive impairment due to acquired brain injury. Headway has identified six key themes, or domains, against which it assesses the level of care provided as well as issues such choice and dignity of service users.

The domains are; Communication, Culture, Development, Governance, Quality, Environment (psychological/emotional) and Environment (physical).

144 Boughton Green Road received a rating of Good-Excellent in six of the domains, and a rating of Good in the seventh. Well done to all the staff who work very hard to continuously improve the service and support that we provide to our service users. They help them to maintain their existing abilities and to progress towards more independence, and acceptance, in a positive environment. The whole team at 144 Boughton Green Road contributes to providing long-term rehabilitation in a supportive and homely environment.

A living room at 144 Boughton Green Road

One of the living rooms at 144 Boughton Green Road

Scale of over-medication is now out in the open

The Care Quality Commission, Public Health England and NHS Improving Quality have recently published reports commissioned by NHS England into the prescribing of psychotic drugs to people with learning disabilities. The research found that there is an alarming rate of over-prescribing of these drugs to people with learning difficulties: the report authored by Public Health England, estimates that up to 35,000 adults with a learning disability are being prescribed an antipsychotic, an antidepressant or both without appropriate clinical justification.

The research concluded that:

  • There is a much higher rate of prescribing of medicines associated with mental illness amongst people with learning disabilities than the general population, often more than one medicine in the same class, and in the majority of cases with no clear justification
  • Medicines are often used for long periods without adequate review
  • There is poor communication with parents and carers, and between different healthcare providers

Dominic Slowie, NHS England’s National Clinical Director for Learning Disabilities admitted that this is an historic problem and the research was needed to find out the scale of the problem so that action could be taken.

This is something that we feel strongly about at The Richardson Partnership for Care, and we regularly review the medication that our service users take with the aim of reducing it over the longer term wherever possible. Our focus is on behavioural therapy and all staff are trained in managing actual or potential aggression using the least restrictive techniques.

This is what the uncle of one of our service users with learning disabilities said about his care:

“Over a period of ten years, my nephew has presented with very challenging behaviour. Having his time with the Richardson Partnership for Care, his behaviour has improved as a result of excellent care. This consists of reducing the ‘chemical cost’ of drug therapy with a range of behaviour modification and genuine and dedicated care, which we greatly appreciate.”

Michael C

Psychological support
Our team of psychologists support our service users to help them to manage their behaviour and maintain their mental health. We have found that personalised care and the right level of clinical psychology provision has enabled individuals with even the most challenging behaviour to make good progress and reduce their medication.

One of the techniques used by our psychologists to help modify behaviours is Applied Behaviour Analysis (ABA). Support staff complete specialised recording forms, which are collated and analysed by the psychologists. The results help us to understand the relationship between specific behaviours and the environment. This means that things that may negatively affect behaviour can be more positively adapted, as part of a learning process.

In addition, each service user has their own health passport to give them ownership of their medical information and clarity regarding the medication that they are taking.

Care homes shine in independent feedback

At The Richardson Partnership for Care, we strive to have an open relationship with service users and their families so that they can tell us straight away if they are concerned about any aspect of their care or their home. We hold regular care reviews as well as completing an annual survey.

This year we have also encouraged service users and their families to provide feedback directly to the online directory carehome.co.uk. Our homes for adults with learning difficulties, 2 & 8 Kingsthorpe Grove, achieved a recommendation score of 9.6 out of 10 from the directory, and we are very proud of some of comments they received. For example, here is a comment from a parent of one of our service users with learning difficulties:

“Our son was taken in by Jayne Payne in 2009. He was in a terrible mental state, he’d been sectioned in Oxford in 2007 for violence, and he had always lived at home until then. Well, Jane and her staff worked and worked with him until he is almost like his old lovely self. They bring him home to us once a month on the Isle of Wight for two days and he looks forward to this as much as we do. We cannot say enough good things about the home: they saved our lives and our son’s. The medical care is fantastic and they are always loving and tolerant of our son, even on his bad days.”
Jane S

And this is what one of the service users had to say:
“I like it here, I am happy here and all of the jobs I do. I like the staff. I go out for drinks and meals out. I have had my bedroom painted. I like my bathroom. I like my lunches. It is a good place to live.”

Click here to see a summary of the survey results  or here to go to the carehome.co.uk directory

A collage created by service users at 8 Kingsthorpe Grove

A collage created by service users at 8 Kingsthorpe Grove

The Mews receives approval from independent Quality Checkers

Northamptonshire County Council employs Total Voice Northamptonshire to provide independent quality checking services. Total Voice is an advocacy service and part of VoiceAbility, which champions the rights and strengthens the voice of people who face disadvantage or discrimination.

Total Voice recently carried out a review of The Mews, one of our homes providing residential care and rehabilitation for adults with acquired brain injuries. They visited The Mews to check the quality of service from a service user’s perspective, interviewing two residents and talking to members of staff as well as looking around the home. After their visit they provided a report of their findings.

Choices and control
An area of key importance to Total Voice is whether service users know how to complain about any aspect of the service and if they think that it will help. The service users interviewed said that they know how to complain and that complaints were listened to and acted upon.

Having a health action plan for each service user is also assessed by Total Voice who found that all residents at The Mews have health action plans and see all relevant health professionals.

The report also highlighted that all residents are free to make their own choices, for example, deciding on holidays, how their rooms are decorated, what they do and where they go. They are free to take informed risks and have keys to their rooms.

The brain injury rehabilitation service provided at The Mews, aims to increase the independence of all service users and these elements of decision making are an important part of this rehabilitation process.

Positive comments
Here are some of the comments the quality checkers made:
“The best one I have been to, it’s about people getting the best support, not about profit and people being greedy.”
“I find it heart-warming.”
“The staff were polite and approachable.”
“There is loads of space. There are places they [service users] can go if they want to chill out.”
“The garden was massive and very nice.”

We welcome independent assessments from all types of organisation, listening objectively to all feedback from third parties, service users, their families and our staff. We endeavour to continually improve the quality of life for people in our homes and the effectiveness of our rehabilitation services, wherever possible.

RPC Care Home Manager shortlisted in National Awards

Congratulations to Jackie Mann, the Manager of numbers 2 & 8 Kingsthorpe Grove, who has been shortlisted in The National Learning Disabilities Awards.

The Awards celebrate excellence in the support for people with learning disabilities and aim to pay tribute to those who excel in providing quality care. Jackie has been shortlisted in the Manager Award category and was nominated because of her dedication to improving the lives of service users.  She manages two homes registered for 18 adults with learning disabilities and is absolutely committed to maximising people’s potential and ensuring they have the best quality of life.

Jackie was recommended for the Award by a parent of one of the service users at 2 & 8 Kingsthorpe Grove who said: “The management of the home is truly excellent. The culture and ethos developed and maintained makes the residence a real home (as opposed to an institution) for the residents, all of whom are adults with severe learning difficulties. I visit the home frequently and witness the exemplary quality of the care provided. Under Jackie’s leadership the company is always able to recruit and develop excellent staff and the very high staff retention is a very important measure of this leadership. This consistency of staff is crucial in allowing the residents to build genuine relationships with staff.”

The care provided in our homes is totally person centred and service users are empowered to follow their interests and goals in life.  Most of the service users under Jackie’s responsibility are difficult to place with behaviours that challenge, so she has a busy role, but always ensures that the interventions recommended by the multidisciplinary team are followed and reviewed. Since starting her role as Manager, Jackie has made many excellent changes including the homes becoming a registered centre with ASDAN. This enables the service users to develop skills for learning, employment and for life whilst achieving qualifications.

The most recent CQC inspection in Oct 2013 found that the homes were achieving in all areas inspected.  A recent inspection by Northamptonshire County Council found the homes to achieve 100 per cent, which they said was rare.

We are proud to work with Jackie and wish her every success in the final of The National Learning Disabilities Awards, to be held in May.

RPC 26.7.12_0088

Jackie Mann, Care Home Manager at 2 & 8 Kingsthorpe Grove