New Acquired Brain Injury Care Home Opening

We’re pleased to announce the launch of The Coach House – our new residential care and rehabilitation service for 11 adults with acquired brain injuries. And to celebrate, we’re holding an Open Day on Thursday 24th January, 2019.

The Coach House is a self-contained home in the grounds of The Mews, another of our specialist residential care homes in Kingsthorpe, Northampton. We’ve spent a lot of time, thought and effort in creating the best environment we can to help people recover from brain injuries and rebuild their lives. We believe that designing a home that is accessible, practical and safe does not mean that it can’t also be cosy, comfortable and feel like home. In fact, we believe this is crucial to service users’ well-being and their engagement in their own rehabilitation plan.

We have some fantastic speakers involved in the event, so please come along to celebrate the opening of the Coach House, meet the team at The Richardson Partnership for Care and find out more about brain injury rehabilitation.

Open Day Programme

9.30am – arrival and coffee
10.00am – 1.00pm – presentations and discussions

Dr Seth A. Mensah, MB ChB, MSc, DPM, MRCPsych – Consultant Neuropsychiatrist
“The Brain and Human Behaviour – What has Phineas Gage taught us?”

Pedro Areias Grilo, HCPC, MSc – Consultant Clinical Psychologist
“Positive Behavioural Tool – capturing positive behaviours in neurorehabilitation”

Jo Throp – Neurological Occupational Therapist and Clinical Director at Krysalis Consultancy
“The Brain and its Function from the Perspective of a Neuro-Occupational Therapist”

1.00pm ribbon cutting, lunch and tour of facilities
2.00pm close

Please reply to Sian.Richardson@careresidential.co.uk or call her on 01604 791071 for more information.

The Coach House residential home for adults with acquired brain injuries

The Coach House, Kingsthorpe, Northampton NN2 7PW

Activities for adults with acquired brain injuries

Building confidence and self-esteem
As well as specific therapeutic inputs, such as occupational therapy, physiotherapy and psychology sessions, service users in our care can also choose to take part in a range of activities each week, depending on their needs and abilities. These activities include music sessions, arts and crafts, ASDAN learning sessions, swimming, visiting local cafes, shops, etc. Not only are they fun and enjoyable activities in their own right, but they are also important in providing a ‘normal’ lifestyle and they support the therapeutic regime provided by the Multi-Disciplinary Team.

One popular activity for several of our service users with acquired brain injuries is Rock Club. It brings together people using different brain injury services in Northamptonshire to take part in a wide range of different activities: Anything from a disco and karaoke night to a bake-off competition, film night or quiz.

Halloween is a big event and the fancy dress disco is eagerly anticipated. Sallie Maris, the Arts and Crafts Co-ordinator at The Richardson Partnership for Care helped some of the service users prepare their Halloween costumes, which was all part of the fun.

Dressing up for HalloweenPreparing for the Halloween party

The Rock Club summer fun day was also a big occasion, with a barbecue, side shows and a visit from ‘Party Animals’ – an organisation that enables people to have close encounters with reptiles, rodents and mammals so they can learn more about them, overcome their fears and build confidence. Terry, one of our service users with an acquired brain injury was inspired to create this poster after the Rock Club summer fun day because he enjoyed it so much.

Terry's Rock Club poster

Rock Club events are held in Northamptonshire every other month, but the benefits extend to both before and after each occasion, and they are just part of the programme of activities included in the care plans for our service users.

As well as being very enjoyable, a varied activity schedule is important to service users in many ways: It helps them to build relationships with other people in a safe, supportive and good-humoured environment. This improves their well-being, self-esteem and confidence. In addition, the activities themselves help to improve motor skills, dexterity, co-ordination, concentration, memory skills, communication and vocal skills.

Brain injury rehabilitation – Kay’s story

Kay - brain injury survivor

Kay has transformed her life with the help of the MDT and support staff at The Richardson Partnership for Care

When she was only 18 months old, Kay contracted Encephalitis and consequently experienced severe epilepsy. At the age of 13, she underwent surgery on her frontal lobe, which further exacerbated the brain damage. Kay also has a diagnosis of moderate learning disability.

Kay lived at home with her mother and grandmother before moving to specialist residential schools and other settings. At the age of 27, Kay moved to The Mews at The Richardson Partnership for Care. She had previously resided in a private hospital, but the placement broke down due to her risk behaviours and the inability to manage Kay in that environment.

Behaviour on Admission to The Richardson Partnership for Care
Kay’s challenging behaviour was thought to be underpinned by poor impulsivity control and a reactive approach to challenging situations due to her brain injury.

On admission, Kay presented with severe verbal and physical aggression towards herself and others. She also would make false allegations towards staff and other residents, disregarding staff prompts and instructions compromising her and others’ overall safety.

Kay was offered a holistic approach to help her to manage her challenging behaviour and become more self-aware. With the support of the multi-disciplinary team at The Richardson Partnership for Care and her care support workers, Kay has transformed her quality of life.

Read Kay’s brain injury rehabilitation case study in full here

Our new residential care home is taking shape

The Coach House will soon become a new residential care home and rehabilitation centre for 11 adults with acquired brain injuries. It is a two-storey building situated in the grounds of The Mews (one of our existing residential care homes) in Northampton, and after extensive renovation work it is now taking shape.

As it’s a listed building, we’ve been working alongside planners and conservation officers to ensure that we retain the integrity and character of the original building, while making it a modern, comfortable place to live. We are extending and renovating it to bring a run-down building back into use, which will provide much-needed accommodation and rehabilitation facilities for people with acquired brain injuries and complex needs.

Maintenance Manager, Dexter Griffin, is managing the project and the team of builders, contractors and specialist trades to ensure that everything runs smoothly and it up to the required specifications and standards.

We are including as many environmentally-friendly and energy-efficient features as possible within the care home. These include rainwater harvesting, and installing the system was a big project. Much of the work happened below ground as we had to dig a hole 5m deep and install a tank capable of holding 42,000 litres of water. The tank then had to be filled and settled before the rest of the hole was filled in. This was one occasion when we were grateful for some torrential rain! The system will collect water from the whole of The Mews’ roof as well as the Coach House, which will be used to flush toilets in both buildings as well as supplying the laundry rooms. In addition to being environmentally-friendly, we will achieve a return on our investment from reduced water and sewerage costs over time.

The roof and external structures are almost complete and we’re looking forward to the scaffolding coming down so we can have a better impression of what the finished care home will look like.

Dexter and the team are now working on the interior framework and services. The care home will have light, spacious bedrooms and communal areas with wide corridors to give a practical, relaxed and comfortable environment. We’ll keep you updated as the building progresses.

The extension of the new care home

Three new bedrooms in the extension, which will have their own individual terraces

Corridor in the Coach House

Corridors will be wide and light

Stonework

The stonework on the new part of the building will age to match the original

Registered Care Home Manager Jacky Johnson

We’re very proud of the multi-disciplinary team that we have at The Richardson Partnership for Care. The Registered Managers in particular, are hugely instrumental in delivering an excellent quality of life and successful outcomes for our service users. They perform their roles with dedication and professionalism, frequently facing challenging situations. We would like to highlight and celebrate these Managers, starting with Jacky Johnson, Registered Manager at 144 Boughton Green Road – a medium/long term home for 14 men who have acquired brain injuries and complex needs.

Jacky Johnson joined The Richardson Partnership for Care as a Registered Manager over seven years ago. She is a highly respected member of our multi-disciplinary team and we asked Consultant Neuropsychiatrist Dr Seth Mensah, who has worked with Jacky since 2016, to describe her. He said:

“I would like to single out Ms Johnson for the recognition of her professionalism, excellent leadership, hardworking attitude, positive commitment and dedication to, in particular, the residents under her care at the home.

“My very first visit to the Residential Home at 144 Boughton Green Road was in 2014 and I will never forget the very welcoming and warm reception that I received from Ms Johnson and her team. I immediately realised that this was a home unlike any other home outside of The Richardson Partnership for Care that I have visited in a professional capacity. The home felt nothing like the typical ‘institutionalised’ homes for those individuals living with intellectual disabilities and acquired brain injuries/complex neurodisability that one tends to still come across in the health and care sector. It most certainly is a place that I have heard the residents themselves feel proud to call their ‘home’ in their own words.

Leadership
“Under Ms Johnson’s leadership, a true visionary and reflective leader, the staff and carers at the home are fully supported and they feel valued and empowered to fulfil their functions and roles. This leadership style translates into a team of dedicated staff who are passionate about what they do, have an in-depth understanding of the organisational culture, fully subscribe to the vision of the organisation as a whole, and perform their duties to the highest standards of care.

“The home feels very homely and welcoming. The residents are very well looked after. Every resident has their own individually-tailored and thoroughly comprehensive care and treatment plan. Under Ms Johnson’s leadership, the carers in the home, whilst maintaining the appropriate standards of true professionalism, and embracing and practicing according to strict professional guidelines, have excellent relationships with the residents and treat them as though they were close family members. This is so endearing and always heart-warming to see, especially in light of the recent bad press that the care sector has received following the sad and unfortunate events surrounding the Winterbourne Care Home scandal.

“I have found Ms Johnson to be a skilled and competent manager, a very good listener who reflects quite deeply on all matters before she speaks, and especially so when dealing with complex matters; dealing with conflict and disagreement within the multidisciplinary team; and dealing with families, especially those who still need psychological and emotional support in their journey to coming to terms with their loved ones who are or have become residents in the home.

Compassionate approach
“Ms Johnson is the kind of manager who is both passionate about and compassionate in her role in caring for those under her care. There are numerous examples of situations where Ms Johnson has demonstrated true professionalism and positive leadership.

Ms Johnson’s selfless devotion to her chosen career, her in-depth experience and expertise in this field, her unquestionable ability to deliver (clinically and managerially) to the highest standards of care, her excellent situational leadership skills, her compassionate approach to caring for the residents under her care, her passion for prudence and excellence in the care sector, her warm and approachable nature, and her exemplary ‘man-management’ skills set her far apart from her peers. And I am sure that the residents and their families, and all the multidisciplinary team at The Richardson Partnership for Care would agree with me.”

Jacky has gained a Level 4 NVQ in Leadership and Management for Care Services and a Diploma in Brain Injury Awareness module. Jacky worked in children’s services for 14 years before transferring to adult services and she continues to maintain her registration as a Social Worker.

Alongside her role as Registered Manager at The Richardson Partnership for Care, Jacky is a MAPA (Managing Actual or Potential Aggression) instructor. She continues to strive to enhance her ongoing professional development with the use of Neuro-Linguistic Programming (NLP).

Jacky is a popular member of the team and her family is also a huge part of her life. She brings this emphasis on family life to the home that she manages, creating a warm, caring environment in which service users are respected, supported and valued.

We would like to thank Jacky for the hard work and dedication that she brings to the team and the positive impact that she has on all of the residents and staff at 144 Boughton Green Road.

Jacky Johnson

Jacky Johnson

The Mews rated ‘Good’ again in CQC inspection

The Mews, one of our homes providing residential care and rehabilitation for adults with acquired brain injuries in Northampton was once again rated ‘Good’ by the Care Quality Commission (CQC).  Following an unannounced inspection on 17 & 19 January 2018, The Mews was rated ‘Good’ by the CQC in all categories: Safe, effective, caring, responsive and well-led. We’d like to thank Registered Manager Helen Petrie and her team for maintaining its high standards, as well as always looking for ways to improve our service. You can read the details of the report below

The CQC reported the following:

“People’s individuality was respected and people continued to be treated with empathy and kindness. The staff were friendly, caring and compassionate. Positive therapeutic relationships had been developed between the people and staff.

“Detailed personalised care plans were in place, which enabled staff to provide consistent care and support in line with people’s personal preferences, choices and needs. End of life wishes were discussed and plans put in place.

“People continued to receive safe care. Staff were appropriately recruited and there were sufficient staff to meet people’s needs. People were protected from the risk of harm and received their prescribed medicines safely.

“The care that people received continued to be effective and positive outcomes for people were being achieved. Staff had access to the support, supervision and training that they required to work effectively in their roles. Development of staff knowledge and skills was encouraged. People were supported to maintain good health and nutrition and reach their full potential.

“People were supported to have maximum choice and control of their lives and staff supported them in the least restrictive way possible; the policies and systems in the home supported this practice. There was a variety of activities available for people to participate in, individually or as a group. Family and friends were welcomed and supported.

“The service had a positive ethos and an open culture. The provider was committed to develop the service and actively looked at ways to continuously improve the service. There were effective quality assurance systems and audits in place; action was taken to address any shortfalls.

“People knew how to raise a concern or make a complaint and the provider had implemented effective systems to manage any complaints that they may receive.”

Details of all recent CQC inspections in our homes.

Brain Injury Rehabilitation physiotherapy

Physiotherapy session for brain injury rehabilitation

Christmas activities in our care homes

Throughout the year we have a wide range of activities for our service users with acquired brain injuries or learning disabilities to enjoy, but at Christmas this is especially important. While many service users go and stay with their families at Christmas, we want to make the day special for those who remain with us over the festive period.

Christmas activities are discussed and planned with service users in their regular house meetings, so they can decide (with support as required) what they would like to do.

This year, Sallie Maris, our Arts & Crafts lady will be ‘chief elf’ when it comes to making Christmas decorations. She will be supporting her helpers to make Christmas bunting and mobiles. Not only is this very enjoyable, it is an important part of our ongoing support and rehabilitation programme, helping people to improve their concentration and dexterity, learn new skills, give them a sense of achievement and satisfaction and increase their self-esteem. We will be using the decorations in each home, as well as for the joint Christmas party on 20th December.

Making a Christmas star

Having a large hall in The Mews enables us to provide opportunities for service users and staff from all of the homes to get together for social events. We hold short-mat bowls sessions in the hall, usually once a week, and monthly music sessions with Simon the Sax. It’s also a great place to hold the joint Christmas party and we have a travelling theatre group coming to perform The Wizard of Oz here for us.

There are lots of trips to see Aladdin at the theatre in Northampton as well as various Christmas dinners taking place – going out to the local pub for lunch, plus Rock Club (service users get together for social activities from three different organisations) and the Headway Christmas lunch. Also, the staff in each home will be coming in on Christmas Day to cook lunch and a former service user from one of our homes has been invited back to spend the day with some of his old friends.

We’ve also been baking gingerbread and other tasty treats. And our home at 23 Duston Road has a new karaoke machine, so there will plenty of singing, as well as various games to play, watching Christmas films and DVDs and going out for a Christmas Day walk, weather permitting.

From all of us at The Richardson Partnership for Care, we would like to wish you a happy and peaceful Christmas and all the best for 2018.

 

Satisfaction survey: our care home residents

Adults with acquired brain injuries, learning disabilities and complex needs

In addition to surveying the families of service users in our care on an annual basis, we also complete a questionnaire with the individuals themselves, which asks specific questions about different aspects of their lives within the care home. They are asked to respond using a satisfaction rating of 0 – 4 where 4 is the most satisfied. All of our service users have complex needs and some are unable to answer the questions, so staff either help them to answer the questions or observe their behaviours to ascertain their needs.

The results from each individual are combined to give average scores, which are shown below. There are up to five questions in each section, so the totals show an indication of satisfaction in each area.

However, as every person is different, and has different needs, our approach is always individualised, person-centred care.

bar chart showing satisfaction survey results

Service user satisfaction survey results 2017

The following gives you more information about the specific areas covered in the satisfaction survey.

Know how to complain
This question assesses how well the individual knows what to do if they have a complaint. The average overall score across the homes was 3.63 out of 4. It excludes the individuals who were unable to understand the question.

People you live with
This is very important to all of our service users, and satisfaction ratings can vary according to the type of care home as stable populations with long term residents tend to have a higher satisfaction rating. The Mews, which focuses on short-term intensive rehabilitation for adults with acquired brain injuries, naturally has more of a changing population. This can affect the dynamics of relationships between the residents. We work hard to ensure that any incoming service users will not upset the balance in any care home and we continually review our admissions policy to ensure that we receive sufficient information in advance of a full assessment of any potential new residents.

There is very much a family environment within our care homes, and many strong friendships develop between individuals. However, like a family, it doesn’t mean that everyone gets on well with everyone else all the time. Therefore it is important that we focus on relationships between individuals and use mediation and psychology to manage any disagreements. As a last resort, we can move individuals into another of our homes but this is rarely necessary.

Decision making
These questions covered how involved people feel in decisions relating to their care plan and risk assessments as well as making choices in their everyday lives.

Staffing
These questions ascertain how well service users know the support staff in their home and how they feel that they are treated by them: whether the staff are approachable, as well as whether they would like to be involved in the interview process. Many service users said that they would not want to be involved, which has reduced the average score.

Food and drink
As well as being asked about their choice of food and their cultural needs, individuals were also asked about how involved they wanted to be in menu planning and food preparation.

Activities
Many of these questions were qualitative: describing current activities undertaken or potential new ones, so a numerical score was not given. The activities that we provide are very much tailored to the individual and if something is requested but not achievable or affordable then we explore alternatives.

Environment
These questions simply asked how satisfied service users are with the communal areas of the home, the garden and their room.

Homes gain high scores in independent assessments

Headway Approved Providers
Two of our residential care homes for adults with acquired brain injuries – The Mews and 144 Boughton Green Road – have been recently re-assessed by Headway, the brain injury charity. The assessment process requires the home to demonstrate the provision of appropriate specialist care for people with complex, physical and/or cognitive impairment due to acquired brain injury. Headway has identified six key themes, or domains, against which it assesses the level of care provided, as well as issues such choice and dignity of service users. The domains are; Communication, Culture, Development, Governance, Quality, Environment (psychological/emotional) and Environment (physical).

We are pleased to report that both The Mews and 144 Boughton Green Road scored well in all of the domains to retain their Approved Provider Status for a further two years. This is subject to passing unannounced visits from Headway assessors during this time.

Headway Approved Provider

Quality Checkers
2&8 Kingsthorpe Grove, our homes for adults with learning disabilities, were recently assessed by Northamptonshire Quality Checkers. This is an independent assessment by an ‘expert by experience’ who meets residents in the home and performs a standardised quality check from the service users’ perspective. They are then supported by a co-ordinator to produce a report of their visit.

The Quality Checker on this occasion was Paul, who was visiting the homes for the first time. He met two service users with learning disabilities who live in the homes. One of them answered a series of questions and Paul used their answers to form the basis of his report. He gave the homes a top rating of ‘Very Good’ for all of the categories assessed, which were; home and bedroom, support staff, activities, food and drink, friends and people in the service user’s life, the service user’s health and what it’s like to live there.

Paul then asked the support staff and manager questions about procedures and safeguarding. As he was so pleased with the home, he made no recommendations for improvements to be made.

Information about other independent inspections of our care homes click here

Summer activities for Service Users

The summer is always a special time of year when, hopefully, the weather allows us to make the most of being outdoors, enjoying the sunshine and fresh air. When it comes to holidays, we make sure that they meet the needs of our service users, who are supported in deciding where they go and who accompanies them. Holidays take a lot of planning, which starts early in the year. But this pays off as they are really enjoyed by the service users who speak fondly of them on their return.

2 & 8 Kingsthorpe Grove – adults with learning difficulties
As many of our service users in these homes have been with us for a long time, they have built friendships and are aware of each others’ strengths, abilities, likes and dislikes. They go away in small groups and are involved in choosing their holiday companions and location. They like familiarity of holiday destinations and routine, so we work to get the balance right, taking into account relaxation and adventure. Destinations have included Yarmouth, Devon, the Isle of Wight and EuroDisney.

Individuals with acquired brain injuries
For our service users with acquired brain injuries, their needs can be more wide-ranging so we tend to organise holidays for small groups of two or three people, and some one-to-one holidays. One of our service users at the Mews had his first holiday since his brain injury 18 years ago when he went to Hemsby in Norfolk with two staff members. He had never wanted to go on holiday previously but had settled in really well since admission, so we offered him the opportunity. He went early in the season before it was too busy and it went really well. He normally mobilises in a wheelchair but he walked whilst in the holiday chalet.

Wherever possible, we try to accommodate specific requests for holiday destinations. The holidays are financed by accruing a certain amount each month then topped up if someone requires something extra. One lady wanted to go to the Eden Project, so with the help of the case manager, we sourced an adapted holiday home and we liaised with a local doctors’ surgery who were able to provide medical support. She went for a week with two carers.

One of our service users went to stay with his family in Serbia, while others shared a caravan at a holiday park in Skegness. Three people went for the first half of the week, three people went for the second half of the week and two joined them for a day trip in the middle. A good time was had by all – they enjoyed the evening entertainment in the clubhouse and daytime activities included going to the amusement arcade, the beach and the funfair, as well as paddle-boating and horse-riding.

In addition, a couple of service users went for a “Revitalise” holiday to Essex, where they joined in with activities such as armchair exercises, bingo and karaoke and had day trips to Clacton and Southend.

Not only is an annual summer holiday an enjoyable experience, for service users with acquired brain injuries, it is also an important part of their rehabilitation programme. It is part of our focus on ‘normalisation’, enabling them to live as close to a normal life as possible and to enjoy things that they may have done before their brain injury, such as having a picnic or fish and chips by the seaside.

The Norfolk Coast

The Norfolk Coast