The Coach House is now a Home

The Coach House, our new residential care home for adults with acquired brain injuries in Northampton, has now completed its CQC registration process and welcomed its first service users. Initially registered for nine beds, The Coach House adds to our portfolio of services by providing longer term slow-stream brain injury rehabilitation, which is often appropriate for people after an initial period of intensive rehabilitation or post-acute care.

As with all of our homes, our aim is to create a place that will feel like home (not like a medical or institutional setting) for the service users who live here. In our thirty years of experience, a warm, homely environment helps service users to engage more in their rehabilitation and have a better quality of life.

Jo Wilkins

Meet Jo Wilkins

Jo Wilkins is the Registered Homes Manager at The Coach House and joined The Richardson Partnership for Care in December 2018. She has worked in the neurological sector for 20 years, and is well-respected amongst her peers, so you may have already met her. You can read more about Jo here.

Why our care homes are in Northampton

We have six specialist residential care homes: three for adults with learning disabilities and three for adults with acquired brain injuries, and all of our homes cater for people who present with behaviour that challenges and have complex needs. All of our homes are located within a few miles of each other in Northampton, and we are often asked why this is the case.

The answer is two-fold. Firstly, Northampton is our home town. My parents started the business back in 1989 when they looked after service users with learning disabilities in their own home, and it grew from there. Having all the homes in Northampton means that we can more be aware of what’s happening in each one. As the owners of the business, we need to ensure its long-term sustainability and that we remain true to our values and objectives. We also need to be confident that we are providing a high-quality service on a day-to-day basis. Being close by helps us to stay in touch with what’s happening in each home. Too many care companies are owned by private equity firms, who view success in terms of profit alone, and not by the welfare and achievements of the people in their care.

Belonging to a community

Having the homes located close together also means that they share resources more easily: members of our multi-disciplinary team of therapists work with service users in all of our homes, so they are much more accessible. In addition, we can provide greater opportunities to service users. They can get together for activities such as short-mat bowling, live music events or parties. It helps them to feel part of a bigger community, increasing social interaction and building confidence.

A hub for neuro specialists

Secondly, Northampton has evolved as a hub for the treatment and care of people with neurological conditions, particularly brain injuries. Consequently, there is a high concentration of specialist care providers for people with acquired brain injuries, learning disabilities or mental health needs. This means that there is a range of a care options to suit individual needs, and The Richardson Partnership for Care forms part of the care pathway. We can also work in partnership with other support services if crisis care is required, providing continuity for service users and improving outcomes.

This specialism in the neurosciences and related care draws neuro experts to Northampton, which also means that there is a larger pool of talented and experienced people in this area. This makes it easier to recruit the right people to deliver the high-quality support that we provide.

Maintaining family relationships

In addition, Northampton’s location in the centre of England, and at the heart of the motorway network, makes it easy to access from most parts of the country. However, we appreciate that many families may still find it difficult to visit their loved ones in our homes. We can therefore include supported home visits as part of the individual’s care plan. This helps them to maintain or rebuild their relationship with their family, which is important for their well-being.

Person-centred care

Although there are many benefits to being in Northampton, we believe that location is just one of a range of factors to consider. What is best for the individual is what counts – the care and therapy provided, the environment, the community and the opportunities for social inclusion and fulfilment. Placing the service user at the centre of the decision-making process is crucial.

Psychology services for adults with complex needs

The psychology team at The Richardson Partnership for Care plays a crucial role in the care and support of our service users, who have complex needs and acquired brain injuries or learning disabilities. Dr Pedro Areias Grilo, Consultant Clinical Neuropsychologist, heads up the team and is supported by three Assistant Psychologists: Julita Frackowska, Olivia Ferrie and Joseph Szablowski. The Assistant Psychologists are assigned to specific service users according to their needs and the homes in which they live.

Person-centred care
The ethos of the psychology team is the one that runs through the organisation as a whole: the service user is at the centre of everything we do. We are committed to providing individualised care to effectively support the nuanced needs of each service user. We take a person-centred approach and offer interventions to service users based on cognitive behavioural models, dialectical behaviour skills and operant conditioning. All of the interventions offered are evidence-based and follow NICE guidelines.

Psychological reviews
All service users receive an initial psychological review, which includes neuropsychological assessments, a review of clinical presentation, assessment of stability of mood and suggestions for future interventions. This review is then repeated on a regular basis to assess the effectiveness of the therapies and interventions delivered. In addition, we have an ‘open door’ policy at The Richardson Partnership for Care, so all members of the psychology team, and the Assistant Psychologists in particular, can develop close working relationships with the service users. This means that their well-being can be monitored closely on an informal basis and we have found that this helps to maintain their mental health, so any problems can be addressed early, preventing the need for crisis care.

Positive Behaviour Support
Positive Behaviour Support (PBS) is a key part of the psychological support that we provide and an emphasis on positivity is one of our main philosophies. PBS Plans are person-centred and designed with input from the service user to promote positive behaviour. They are supported to set their own goals and to achieve them.

In addition, Pedro and the team are working on an innovative Positive Behaviour Tool to more effectively monitor and encourage positive behaviour. This runs alongside the traditional techniques of reducing negative behaviour.

Multi-Disciplinary Team
The psychology team works closely with the other members of the multi-disciplinary team. (This comprises a consultant neuropsychiatrist, homes managers, service manager, physiotherapist, speech & language therapist and occupational therapist.) Pedro and Consultant Neuropsychiatrist, Dr Seth Mensah, work closely together to balance the use of drug therapies and psychosocial therapies. Where possible, we aim to focus on psychosocial approaches and gradually reduce the reliance on drug therapy to achieve better outcomes for service users over the longer term.

A diagram explaining the psychology services at The Richardson Partnership for Care
A summary of the psychology services offered at The Richardson Partnership for Care

Watch our video

Click on the link below to watch the video that was filmed at the opening of The Coach House, our new residential care and rehabilitation home for adults with long-term brain injuries and complex needs. It encapsulates the essence of our organisation and the homes that we provide for our service users.

The Coach House video

Liam cutting the ribbon to open The Coach House
Liam, a brain injury survivor and former service user, cut the ribbon to formally open The Coach House

New Acquired Brain Injury Care Home Opening

We’re pleased to announce the launch of The Coach House – our new residential care and rehabilitation service for 11 adults with acquired brain injuries. And to celebrate, we’re holding an Open Day on Thursday 24th January, 2019.

The Coach House is a self-contained home in the grounds of The Mews, another of our specialist residential care homes in Kingsthorpe, Northampton. We’ve spent a lot of time, thought and effort in creating the best environment we can to help people recover from brain injuries and rebuild their lives. We believe that designing a home that is accessible, practical and safe does not mean that it can’t also be cosy, comfortable and feel like home. In fact, we believe this is crucial to service users’ well-being and their engagement in their own rehabilitation plan.

We have some fantastic speakers involved in the event, so please come along to celebrate the opening of the Coach House, meet the team at The Richardson Partnership for Care and find out more about brain injury rehabilitation.

Open Day Programme

9.30am – arrival and coffee
10.00am – 1.00pm – presentations and discussions

Dr Seth A. Mensah, MB ChB, MSc, DPM, MRCPsych – Consultant Neuropsychiatrist
“The Brain and Human Behaviour – What has Phineas Gage taught us?”

Pedro Areias Grilo, HCPC, MSc – Consultant Clinical Psychologist
“Positive Behavioural Tool – capturing positive behaviours in neurorehabilitation”

Jo Throp – Neurological Occupational Therapist and Clinical Director at Krysalis Consultancy
“The Brain and its Function from the Perspective of a Neuro-Occupational Therapist”

1.00pm ribbon cutting, lunch and tour of facilities
2.00pm close

Please reply to Sian.Richardson@careresidential.co.uk or call her on 01604 791071 for more information.

The Coach House residential home for adults with acquired brain injuries

The Coach House, Kingsthorpe, Northampton NN2 7PW

Brain injury rehabilitation – Kay’s story

Kay - brain injury survivor

Kay has transformed her life with the help of the MDT and support staff at The Richardson Partnership for Care

When she was only 18 months old, Kay contracted Encephalitis and consequently experienced severe epilepsy. At the age of 13, she underwent surgery on her frontal lobe, which further exacerbated the brain damage. Kay also has a diagnosis of moderate learning disability.

Kay lived at home with her mother and grandmother before moving to specialist residential schools and other settings. At the age of 27, Kay moved to The Mews at The Richardson Partnership for Care. She had previously resided in a private hospital, but the placement broke down due to her risk behaviours and the inability to manage Kay in that environment.

Behaviour on Admission to The Richardson Partnership for Care
Kay’s challenging behaviour was thought to be underpinned by poor impulsivity control and a reactive approach to challenging situations due to her brain injury.

On admission, Kay presented with severe verbal and physical aggression towards herself and others. She also would make false allegations towards staff and other residents, disregarding staff prompts and instructions compromising her and others’ overall safety.

Kay was offered a holistic approach to help her to manage her challenging behaviour and become more self-aware. With the support of the multi-disciplinary team at The Richardson Partnership for Care and her care support workers, Kay has transformed her quality of life.

Read Kay’s brain injury rehabilitation case study in full here

Our new residential care home – update

The excitement is building as our new residential care home and rehabilitation centre gets closer to completion. The Coach House is a listed building in the grounds of one of our existing care homes, and it hadn’t been used for many years. It is being renovated and extended and will soon become a new residential care home and rehabilitation centre for 11 adults with acquired brain injuries.

The scaffolding is down and a large team of trades people are busily working away inside. Doors are being hung, skirting boards and architraves fitted; The underfloor heating is in and floors are being tiled, and wet-rooms fitted out.

The terrace has been laid outside the bedrooms and the fine weather has meant that we’ve made good progress on the groundworks, so we’ll soon be in a position to show round visitors – we’ll keep you posted!

The Coach House - exterior

The Coach House – exterior

The Coach House - terraces

The Coach House – terraces

Sad news and tribute to Brian Richardson

Brian Richardson

Brian Richardson

This month we pay tribute to my dad, Brian Richardson, who has died after a short illness: He was diagnosed with Lymphoma in his brain in April this year. Brian was the driving force behind The Richardson Partnership for Care, which he founded with my mum, Jackie, in 1989.

Brian was an amazing man who touched the lives and hearts of so many people. He was born on Christmas Eve 1949 and grew up in humble surroundings in Northampton with his parents and two brothers. His entrepreneurial spirit was evident from a young age when he would devise enterprising schemes, which included repairing motorbikes on the lawn in front of the family home.

After leaving school Brian attended the newly opened Nene College in Northampton and qualified as a teacher, however he didn’t quite fit into the teaching world. Instead he came home with a teenage student who desperately needed short-term foster care and that was the beginning of his career as a carer.

Brian and Jackie started The Richardson Partnership for Care in their own home, caring for people with learning disabilities. In fact, two of the people that they looked after then are still residents in our care homes now, almost thirty years later. They built up the business with love, sheer hard work, determination and dedication; qualities that Brian also displayed in his personal and social life.

Brian and Jackie grew the business by buying up properties in Northampton to enable them to care for more people. They also recognised there was a need for specialist residential care and rehabilitation for people with acquired brain injuries, so extended the services to care for them too. I grew up in the business and have worked full time for The Richardson Partnership for Care since leaving school. Around 15-20 years ago, I was appointed a Director, and Brian and Jackie gradually stepped down from the day to day running of the business, handing over to me and my husband Greg.

The Richardson Partnership for Care is very much Brian’s legacy. He and Jackie established it to feel more like a family than a business. Brian was more than a boss to his employees – he was a true friend and a gentleman. He was known for his generosity, often helping people out when they didn’t expect it and investing in their personal development. He gave them the skills and the freedom to move on, but many of the staff chose to stay. This is still the case today.

Part of Brian’s legacy is also the ethos of The Richardson Partnership for Care and its commitment to providing a warm, friendly and positive environment for people with learning disabilities and acquired brain injuries. They are treated with dignity and respect and we aim to support them to realise their potential and live a fulfilling life.
Brian was a man who lived life to the full. He had many friends and a wide range of interests. As a youngster he would go to the Salon ballroom with his parents where he achieved gold medals for Ballroom and Latin American Dancing, and in later years he would love to Rock and Roll and Salsa with Jackie and Laura. He also loved the outdoors: he enjoyed walking and fishing, but his great passion was stalking and shooting. He was also a confident and extremely competent diver, as well as fast and enthusiastic skier. He was a risk-taker and had a reputation for a having a dare-devil attitude, which is perhaps why he was so much fun.

Brian was a warm and generous host and loved cooking for friends and family. He has been described as kind, caring, friendly, funny, a life-long friend, supportive, great company, interesting, intelligent, daring, obstinate and even, eccentric. We will miss him dearly, but we endeavour to maintain the ethos and vision for The Richardson Partnership for Care that Brian and Jackie established.

Summer holidays and activities

The excitement has been building as the holiday season is now well underway and we’ve had weeks of glorious sunshine. Holidays are planned months in advance and our service users, who have acquired brain injuries, or learning disabilities and complex needs, are supported in choosing where they would like to go.

Wherever possible, we try to accommodate specific requests for holiday destinations and they are financed by accruing a certain amount each month then topped up if someone needs something extra. Service users go away in small groups or individually, depending on their needs and preferences. They are supported by their care workers and they are involved in the decisions on who accompanies them.

Our service users enjoy the activities, atmosphere and the change in environment that a holiday brings. Some people need familiarity and routine so we balance this with the opportunity for enjoying new experiences. This year, some of our service users have been on a boat or seen the sea for the first time. Going on holiday is paramount to their health and well-being and is instrumental in their social inclusion and positive feelings of self-worth. There are also physical benefits of being outside and taking part in new activities.

This year popular holiday destinations include the Isle of Wight, Hemsby in Norfolk and Skegness in Lincolnshire – which is also close enough for a day trip. Billing Aquadrome is a local holiday park with good facilities, which is popular as it combines a change of scene and a relaxed holiday environment with a very convenient location. In addition, one service user has enjoyed a weekend trip to Blackpool, and others have visited their respective families in Malta and Serbia. We’ve also enjoyed day trips to London, the coast, zoos and country parks. Summer activities have also included trampolining and swimming, and one of our service users went to a David Byrne concert in London. We support our service users to lead a fulfilling and active life as possible.

A boat moored off the Norfolk Coast

Our new residential care home is taking shape

The Coach House will soon become a new residential care home and rehabilitation centre for 11 adults with acquired brain injuries. It is a two-storey building situated in the grounds of The Mews (one of our existing residential care homes) in Northampton, and after extensive renovation work it is now taking shape.

As it’s a listed building, we’ve been working alongside planners and conservation officers to ensure that we retain the integrity and character of the original building, while making it a modern, comfortable place to live. We are extending and renovating it to bring a run-down building back into use, which will provide much-needed accommodation and rehabilitation facilities for people with acquired brain injuries and complex needs.

Maintenance Manager, Dexter Griffin, is managing the project and the team of builders, contractors and specialist trades to ensure that everything runs smoothly and it up to the required specifications and standards.

We are including as many environmentally-friendly and energy-efficient features as possible within the care home. These include rainwater harvesting, and installing the system was a big project. Much of the work happened below ground as we had to dig a hole 5m deep and install a tank capable of holding 42,000 litres of water. The tank then had to be filled and settled before the rest of the hole was filled in. This was one occasion when we were grateful for some torrential rain! The system will collect water from the whole of The Mews’ roof as well as the Coach House, which will be used to flush toilets in both buildings as well as supplying the laundry rooms. In addition to being environmentally-friendly, we will achieve a return on our investment from reduced water and sewerage costs over time.

The roof and external structures are almost complete and we’re looking forward to the scaffolding coming down so we can have a better impression of what the finished care home will look like.

Dexter and the team are now working on the interior framework and services. The care home will have light, spacious bedrooms and communal areas with wide corridors to give a practical, relaxed and comfortable environment. We’ll keep you updated as the building progresses.

The extension of the new care home

Three new bedrooms in the extension, which will have their own individual terraces

Corridor in the Coach House

Corridors will be wide and light

Stonework

The stonework on the new part of the building will age to match the original