Satisfaction survey: our care home residents

Adults with acquired brain injuries, learning disabilities and complex needs

In addition to surveying the families of service users in our care on an annual basis, we also complete a questionnaire with the individuals themselves, which asks specific questions about different aspects of their lives within the care home. They are asked to respond using a satisfaction rating of 0 – 4 where 4 is the most satisfied. All of our service users have complex needs and some are unable to answer the questions, so staff either help them to answer the questions or observe their behaviours to ascertain their needs.

The results from each individual are combined to give average scores, which are shown below. There are up to five questions in each section, so the totals show an indication of satisfaction in each area.

However, as every person is different, and has different needs, our approach is always individualised, person-centred care.

bar chart showing satisfaction survey results

Service user satisfaction survey results 2017

The following gives you more information about the specific areas covered in the satisfaction survey.

Know how to complain
This question assesses how well the individual knows what to do if they have a complaint. The average overall score across the homes was 3.63 out of 4. It excludes the individuals who were unable to understand the question.

People you live with
This is very important to all of our service users, and satisfaction ratings can vary according to the type of care home as stable populations with long term residents tend to have a higher satisfaction rating. The Mews, which focuses on short-term intensive rehabilitation for adults with acquired brain injuries, naturally has more of a changing population. This can affect the dynamics of relationships between the residents. We work hard to ensure that any incoming service users will not upset the balance in any care home and we continually review our admissions policy to ensure that we receive sufficient information in advance of a full assessment of any potential new residents.

There is very much a family environment within our care homes, and many strong friendships develop between individuals. However, like a family, it doesn’t mean that everyone gets on well with everyone else all the time. Therefore it is important that we focus on relationships between individuals and use mediation and psychology to manage any disagreements. As a last resort, we can move individuals into another of our homes but this is rarely necessary.

Decision making
These questions covered how involved people feel in decisions relating to their care plan and risk assessments as well as making choices in their everyday lives.

Staffing
These questions ascertain how well service users know the support staff in their home and how they feel that they are treated by them: whether the staff are approachable, as well as whether they would like to be involved in the interview process. Many service users said that they would not want to be involved, which has reduced the average score.

Food and drink
As well as being asked about their choice of food and their cultural needs, individuals were also asked about how involved they wanted to be in menu planning and food preparation.

Activities
Many of these questions were qualitative: describing current activities undertaken or potential new ones, so a numerical score was not given. The activities that we provide are very much tailored to the individual and if something is requested but not achievable or affordable then we explore alternatives.

Environment
These questions simply asked how satisfied service users are with the communal areas of the home, the garden and their room.

Families’ survey results 2017

We encourage feedback from the families of the service users in our care on a regular basis, but once a year we formalise this process by sending them a short questionnaire to complete. It is sent to both the families of service users who have learning disabilities and those who have an acquired brain injury. We ask all families whether they strongly agree, agree, don’t know or disagree with the following statements:

1. I am happy with the care provided for my relative
2. The home has a warm, non-institutional feeling
3. The home provides an inclusive or family environment
4. Staff are friendly and approachable
5. I am regularly updated with information
6. I feel that my relative is treated with dignity and respect
7. I feel that their quality of life has improved since they arrived at The Richardson Partnership for Care
8. I feel that my relative takes part in meaningful and/or enjoyable activities
9. Would you recommend The Richardson Partnership for Care?

We are very pleased that:
100% of respondents strongly agreed or agreed with the statements: “I am happy with the care provided” and “The home has a warm, non-institutional feeling.”

And 100% of those who answered said that they would recommend The Richardson Partnership for Care to others.

We take note of all the feedback and we’re not complacent, making sure that we address any concerns raised. The responses to each question are show below:

graph showing 2017 survey results

2017 Survey results

We would like to thank all of the family members who took the time to complete our annual survey, and we are delighted with some of the comments that we have received. Some of them are shown below with the names removed to protect the identity of the service users.

Comments from families of service users with learning disabilities:

“He has been there over 20 years. Quality of life could not be better.”

“The home is friendly and welcoming, the other residents are pleasant and friendly… They know her so well and it is her second family, and when we visit we are welcomed… She gets help and support from all and she is treated with respect and love… I have no problem recommending your services, they are outstanding.”

“He has progressed so much this year, being able to go on holiday and attend social events… He realises he is cared for well and that he is valued within his community… He is like a new man, he was very dependent on drug therapy when he arrived at Richardson’s. Your care has enabled him to flourish and grow… the social and psychological stimulation helps him make progress. We would like to thank you for all your highly skilled and sensitive work with him.”

Comments from families of service users with acquired brain injury:

“Excellent care that has made a positive difference to my husband and his demeanour… Importantly staff display a warmth, empathy and understanding towards my husband…Thank you. Your care of my husband has made a big difference to his quality of life.”

“I have always been very happy with the care my sister has… Although she is not much of a mixer, there is a good family atmosphere… She has very challenging behaviour but I think she has the best quality of life possible… As long as she has been with the Richardson Partnership, she has only ever got the best care possible.”

 

Olivia and Jo join the psychology team

Assistant Psychologists Olivia Shepherd and Jovita Valuckaite have joined Julita Frackowska in the psychology team, which is headed up by Consultant Clinical Psychologist Dr Pedro Areias Grilo.

The Assistant Psychologists are assigned to specific service users depending on their needs and the homes in which they live. Julita supports service users in 2 & 8 Kingsthorpe Grove who have learning disabilities, autism spectrum disorders and mental health needs. Olivia works with service users at 144 Boughton Green Road and The Mews, providing psychological and practical support for people with acquired brain injuries and mental health needs, and Jo works with service users at 23 Duston Road and The Mews, supporting people with acquired brain injuries, dual diagnosis, mental health needs and behaviour that challenges.

The Assistant Psychologists perform an important role, completing psychometric assessments for service users to monitor cognition, mood, mental state and behaviour. They provide psychological reports for each individual, which include a functional analysis of their risk behaviours which is used to inform their individualised treatment plan. They also offer advice, psychological support (including cognitive behavioural therapy, cognitive stimulation therapy, substance misuse work and relaxation) as well as providing practical support such as budgeting and functional living skills.

Consultant Clinical Psychologist Dr Pedro Areias Grilo heads the psychology team. He is an inspiration to his colleagues due to his work ethic and methodical approach but most of all, he is immensely passionate about making a difference to service users. He works closely with other members of our multi-disciplinary clinical team, especially Consultant Neuropsychiatrist Dr Seth Mensah, to develop individualised treatment plans for service users. He also works directly with the service users to provide therapy, supporting them and monitoring their progress. In addition, Pedro oversees the work of the Assistant Psychologists, both supporting them in their role to deliver therapy and complete standard assessments but also challenging them academically to find better ways of working.

Olivia Shepherd and Jovita Valuckaite

From left to right: Assistant Psychologists Olivia Shepherd and Jovita Valuckaite

National Learning Disability & Autism Awards 2016

We are delighted to have been shortlisted as finalists in the National Learning Disability and Autism Awards 2016 in the Employer Award category.

In order for us to provide a consistently high quality of service to the people in our care, we recognise that we need to have skilled, caring and hard-working employees who are dedicated to their work. It is only fair that we support them as best we can and help them to gain the skills that they need to progress in their roles, and this is what we always aim to do.

What makes us different?
Dr Pedro Areias Grilo, a Consultant Clinical Psychologist has worked at The Richardson Partnership for Care since 2014 and has a substantial array of clinical experience, both in the private and public healthcare sectors. This allows him to have significant insight and awareness about the services that we offer to meet effectively the needs of individuals we cater for. He has highlighted what makes The Richardson Partnership for Care stand out against other care homes.

Supporting staff
The Richardson Partnership for Care (RPC) is on the forefront of care offered in the UK and is currently able to offer, meet and surpass the needs of all individuals they cater for. They strive to go the extra mile to effectively support people. How? They empower staff to strive and accomplish. They develop their staff through in-house weekly training sessions, weekly reflective practice facilitated by Consultant Clinical Psychologists, effective supervision and open-door practice. Likewise, staff feel skilled, supported, cared, involved and motivated to deliver outstanding care and to strive on their roles. The professional satisfaction, sense of belonging and ability to acknowledge what needs to be done to support individuals in need is immense. This impacts positively on the care being delivered. The individuals’ lives change immensely and they feel they are part of a family, rather than people just “living” in a place. They have a home, a family, a social network and happiness. This is what care is about: Enhancement of life quality. The Richardson Partnership for Care without any doubts, offers this and much more.

Multi-disciplinary team
RPC also employs a Multidisciplinary team (MDT), currently offering to the individuals they support an in-house Consultant Neuropsychiatrist, two Consultants Clinical Psychologists, one part-time and one full-time Assistant Psychologist, one Occupational Therapist, one Physiotherapist and one Speech and Language Therapist. I must say, this is extraordinary. As evidenced, RPC has the ability to offer in-house clinicians to immediately and efficiently meet all the needs of the individuals they support.

Innovations
There are also constant innovations. The MDT and Registered Home Managers meet frequently to evaluate the best treatment and intervention plans to support the individuals they cater for. In-house treatment directories were developed, based on NICE guidelines and clinical evidence, to effectively meet and support individuals’ needs. This makes a substantial difference in terms of care being delivered.

I believe RPC could offer what the majority of other organizations do. But no. They have decided to take the hard route. The route that requires an outstanding commitment, the route that might bring discussions, challenges, the route that brings changes, the route that takes people out of their comfort zone. However, this is the route to excellence, which RPC is and will continue to follow.

Greg and Laura are far ahead of their time. They have a clear understanding of the service they offer and where it must go. They have the individuals’ care on the centre of their hearts and the awareness and rationality to observe, analyze, discuss and establish action plans to meet individuals’ needs. This makes the difference and impacts substantially on the service being delivered. This brings innovation and positive changes to care services in the UK.

Dr Pedro Areias Grilo
Consultant Clinical Psychologist
Birmingham University Honorary Tutor

What makes RPC different?

Residential care in the heart of the community

There is much debate on whether community-based support is better than ‘institutional care’ but of course, it depends on the individual. It also depends on the type of care and support. One of the best ways to describe our specialist residential care homes is ‘a place that feels like home’. Yes, we deliver effective intensive short-term rehabilitation and long-term rehabilitation for adults with acquired brain injury. We also provide care and support for adults with learning difficulties and behaviour that challenges. And we have a high support worker to service user ratio, but we strive to provide an environment that feels like a home, not an institution. It’s safe, comfortable and homely. Our homes provide companionship, and protect vulnerable people from social isolation, loneliness and hate crime.

Community engagement
We also enable service users to be part of the local community. All of our care homes in Northampton are situated close to local shops and facilities, as well as within easy access to the town centre. For service users who are able to, popping out to the local shops means that they feel part of the local community and ‘normal’, especially when they see people they know. It’s also part of our focus on ‘normalisation’ for service users with an acquired brain injury. Enabling them to live as close to a normal life as possible is an important part of their rehabilitation.

We are fortunate that we have some great local pubs where the staff understand the needs of our service users and are very welcoming and helpful. In December we held a 60th birthday party for a service user at the local pub. Donald enjoyed a lovely meal with his sister, all his fellow service users from his home and members of staff. He’s been living in our care home for over 20 years and it was a really lovely occasion. And the pub staff even sang ‘Happy Birthday’ to him!

Donald's birthday cakeCompany ethos
As well as everyday trips to the shops and special occasions, there are also trips to the cinema, sports centres and cafés. They help every service user to become familiar with their local environment and make them feel at home. It’s all part of the ethos of The Richardson Partnership for Care, ensuring that service users are treated with dignity and respect, actively supported to make their own choices and given the opportunity to participate in community activities.

Donald and his sister

Donald with his sister at his birthday party

Selina gains Level 4 Diploma in Adult Care

Congratulations to Selina Vernon, Assessor and Review Co-ordinator at our homes for adults with learning difficulties, who has completed her Level 4 Diploma in Adult Care. This is a new qualification and Selina is the first person to pass it in the UK with training and qualifications body ARC (Association for Real Change).

It was recognised that there was a need for senior people in the residential care sector who were not registered managers but wanted to gain a management qualification. This Level 4 Diploma in Adult Care fills the gap below the new Level 5 Leadership qualification and covers areas such as:

  • Advanced communication skills
  • Implementing equality and diversity policies
  • Facilitating support planning to ensure positive outcomes for individuals and to support well-being
Selina Vernon

Selina Vernon has achieved the new Level 4 Diploma in Adult Care

Selina achieved her qualification by assessment in the workplace with support and quality assurance/verification from ARC. Selina commented: “After completing my assessors’ award, I wanted to develop my knowledge further to be able to better support the individuals in my care and also my candidates. The level 4 was a natural progression with a good range of units to cater for different care environments. The units were relevant and required me to push myself in order to develop my knowledge to achieve the diploma. The support I received from ARC was fantastic.”

Congratulations also go to Joanna Okoro, Mike Femi Ayenitaju and Ranga Gorejena who have achieved Level 3 Diplomas in Health and Social Care.

At The Richardson Partnership for Care our aim to enable people to realise their potential, applies to our staff as well as our service users. Staff are given the opportunity, encouragement and support to build their knowledge and confidence and to better meet the diverse needs of all of the individuals that we care for. As well as the opportunity to take a range of qualifications, all support staff complete a comprehensive training schedule which involves them attending training every three weeks as part of their working rota. This includes statutory training such as health and safety and food hygiene as well as crisis prevention, epilepsy, dementia and working with people with learning disabilities. More information on our training schedule can be found here:

For more information about the qualification, go to the ARC website.

Using online apps to stay in touch

Online applications are transforming the way that we live and work, and at The Richardson Partnership for Care we are using them to help service users and their families keep in touch, and for the families to participate in the review process.

Our service users with learning disabilities have an external review every 12 months where their care team and case workers review their care plan and discuss their progress. The service user can choose whether or not they take part in the review, but under The Care Act 2014, reviews should be attended by a family member or advocate.

Some family members live too far away to attend all of the reviews or find it difficult because of work and other family commitments. We recently arranged for a family to participate in a review using Facetime. This application, similar to Skype, enabled the family to make a video call over the internet.

This was the first time that we had used a video call to enable a family to take part in a review and it was a great success. We received positive comments from the family as well as the care manager. The family were able to contribute fully to all areas discussed: they could see and hear the review team and ask questions as well as providing their thoughts and feelings on the care package. They said that it was just like being there!

On this occasion, the service user declined to take part in the review, but they had a video call with their family afterwards and spoke with their care manager and review coordinator about what had happened in the review.

We are now setting up regular video calls for service users and their families to stay in touch, which benefits everyone and in particular, reassures parents who live some distance away. It also enables family members overseas to stay in touch and be involved.

iPad showing different apps

Party food enjoyed by all

As we approach Christmas, parties and party food are an important part of the festivities. We are busy planning for the Christmas parties in all of our homes, but for service users with acquired brain injuries and associated swallowing difficulties, this requires extra thought and care.

Party food accessible to all has been a regular theme for service users’ get-togethers, and the impact of eating and drinking difficulties on service users is a subject covered in staff training sessions. One of the things frequently discussed has been how to make party food – traditionally sausage rolls and sandwiches – accessible and appetising for those people who take a single textured diet.

A great deal of thought and planning is going into this year’s Christmas parties and we are looking forward to preparing a range of appetising food that can be enjoyed by everyone. The menu will include:

  • Tasty sandwiches made into a single texture using a soaking solution as advocated by the thickening manufacturers
  • Open sandwiches topped with tuna and cheese spread
  • Finger foods made from ingredients such as smoked salmon and mashed potato
  • ‘Bite and dissolve’ crisps
  • Tiramisu – a particular favourite and flavoured with drinking chocolate to achieve the perfect single texture

In the past we have also used shot glasses to provide small tasters of a range of different flavours to make a change for special occasions. We are all looking forward to having tasty party food that can be enjoyed by staff and service users alike.

Christmas tree and presents

Holidays form important part of brain injury rehabilitation

During the summer, service users with acquired brain injuries went to a range of different holiday destinations including Norfolk, Lincolnshire, Shropshire and Wales, as well as supported home visits to all parts of the UK and further afield.

The choice of holiday destination is a decision made by each service user – we respect each person’s individuality and actively support them in making decisions, with the aim of increasing their autonomy. Not only is an annual summer holiday an enjoyable experience, for service users with acquired brain injuries it is also an important part of their rehabilitation programme and helps them in many ways. For example, a holiday is part of our focus on ‘normalisation’, enabling our service users to live as close to a normal life as possible and to enjoy things that they may have done before their brain injury, such as having a picnic or fish and chips by the seaside.

Novel experiences
Although some of our service users need to keep to a routine, they all enjoyed the opportunity to see and experience new things and especially meeting and chatting to new people. Novel experiences enhance learning and when they are put into a functional context, such as preparing for and taking part in a holiday, they can provide an important source of practice and maintenance for skills.

Short term memory
The holidays also provide a focus for orientation for service users experiencing short term memory loss. For instance, preparing for a holiday and buying new clothes provide cognitive stimulation and enable service users to be excited about going away.

There are benefits to be gained after the holiday too – putting all of the photographs into an album also aids cognitive stimulation and the album provides a novel reference point for discussions about the trip and assists in a service users’ ongoing rehabilitation.

Quality of life
Quality of life is important to everyone and a relaxed and leisurely week by the sea provides some fresh air and a much welcome change of routine. Supported home visits helped service users to reconnect with family members and gave them all a real boost. All of these activities form part of individual rehabilitation programmes to increase skills and independence and to improve service users’ physical and emotional well-being.

The Norfolk Coast

The Norfolk Coast is a favourite holiday destination for some of our service users

Feedback from Service Users’ families

At The Richardson Partnership for Care we strive to provide an open environment, welcoming feedback from service users’ families about the care of their loved ones. We also complete an annual survey, which provides family members with a more formal opportunity to tell us about their views on the care, support and rehabilitation services that we provide for adults with acquired brain injuries and learning difficulties.

The survey is entirely optional and consequently the number of responses can be quite small. However, we are very proud of the feedback that we have received.

100% of respondents strongly agreed or agreed with the statement:
“I am happy with the care provided”

100% of respondents strongly agreed or agreed with the statement:
“I feel that my relative is treated with dignity and respect”

100% of respondents strongly agreed or agreed with the statement:
“I feel that their quality of life has improved since they arrived at The Richardson Partnership for Care”

100% of respondents said that they would recommend The Richardson Partnership for Care

93% of respondents strongly agreed or agreed with the statement:
“The home has a warm, non-institutional feeling.”

93% of respondents strongly agreed or agreed with the statement:
“The home has an inclusive or family environment.”

We scored less highly on updating service users’ families with information – only 69% of respondents strongly agreed or agreed with the statement: “I am regularly updated with information.” This is therefore something for us to focus on and improve upon.

We were pleased to receive the following comments:

“All staff are great and some exceptional.”

“His life quality has improved considerably over the last 11.5 years. He lives in a calm, comfortable, caring, clean environment where he is encouraged to relax – waylaying his self-harm and anxiety”

“His life skills have developed from him being nervous and frightened to a confident and happy man.”

“Our thanks as a family for our daughter’s care and treatment.”

“He is very well cared for by professional carers who not only meet his needs, but work to challenge him to develop his social skills.”

We would like to thank all of the family members who took the time to complete our annual survey. If you would like any further information about our services, please contact us.